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What to look for in an investigator


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#1 NocturnalCantaloupe

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Posted 16 July 2004 - 05:59 AM

   I think we've covered elsewhere on the board, what to look for in an investigation group, but what about those groups that are looking for new members?  What should they be looking for in new hopefuls?

Well lets see what everyone thinks are some key qualities and skills that would help make a great investigator- one that any group would love to have as part of their team.

Ideas?  Post your thoughts!
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#2 krcguns

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Posted 16 July 2004 - 03:56 PM

First of all you need to find someone that has a genuine interest in the paranormal and not just a fleeting fancy due to boredom.

Second, you need someone with a good attitude.  Someone that is willing to do what ever is needed for the group to be succesful.

Third, you need someone that can be objective.  You don't want someone that doesn't believe that anything at all can be paranormal and you don't want someone that thinks that everything is paranormal.  You need some balance in order to take a look at all the evidence and throw out what is mundane and keep what is paranormal and be able to learn the difference. ;D
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#3 cryptkeeper

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Posted 19 July 2004 - 09:58 AM

Speaking as the Director of ODPI, what I look for is like my fellow ghost village member said a actually love for the paranormal. Not someone who is just wanting to do this for a thrill.

Also some one who can take this seriously but yet still have fun.  Must agree to abide by the rule as accept managerial instruction.  Rules such as no smoking or drinking on investigations.

I guess my training as a Drill Sergeant in the Army makes me run a tight camp.  But we are also fun loving and professional in the same respect.

What you should look for in new members varies from group to group. As each as its own expectations.  What I have found is many new members hate researching history, but that is a key fact in doing paranormal investigations. You have to know what has happened on this property to find out what you may be dealing with.

I have found many that just want to be on site doing the investigation, but not to research.  All members have to at some point or another do research.

Hope I have not bored you lol.


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#4 NocturnalCantaloupe

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Posted 19 July 2004 - 11:48 AM

Heck no, no worries!  You hit on a good point.  Research!  This includes getting to know your local and county government departments rather well :)  County usually has more detailed records I would think.
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#5 Holly

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Posted 20 July 2004 - 06:36 AM

Actually, research is one of my favorite parts of the investigation. I guess that's because it all comes together when I can put names and reasons to the situation at hand.

An investigator must also be willing to follow an investigation through to completion - I know there's alot to explore out there, but one project must be finished before another is begun. Otherwise, we are stretched too thin and a thorough job may not be done.

I have the added advantage of being able to clearly see apparitions...have since I was a child. And you know what? Sometimes there is just no investigation to be done. In other words, the spirit is happy where they are, they choose to be there, and the living are content with it. I think that's a happy situation and should be left alone.

Two years ago, I saw two perfectly happy elderly women in a park in Boston. It was clear to me they were best friends or sisters, and they strolled arm in arm, smiling. At first I actually thought they were living. They were spirits,though, and they were taking their walk through an area they probably frequented alot during their lives. They continue to visit, they are happy....and so was I!
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#6 blueivvy

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Posted 25 July 2004 - 04:20 PM

 I'm part of a group that has gone through quite a few members.  I think the things that are most important are an open mind to the suggestions of other members, a willingness to explore possibilites rather than assume everything that happens is paranormal, and be willing to act as part of a team rather than a superstar ghost hunter. If you're trying to outdo everyone, you probably shouldn't be part of a group, you know?

I couldn't agree more with what Holly said about following through to completion.  It's easy to run off to the next haunted place, but what have you accomplished if things get left half done?

A couple things that are sure-fire ways to make a bad impression are showing up late, hitting on other team members, bringing young children and acting as if you're possesed at every investigation.  Unfortunatley, past members have done all of those things to us, and after awhile it causes you to be seen as a hinderance, and it puts the groups reputation in jeopardy.

#7 MoonChild

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 10:08 AM

anything new to be added?
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#8 Whyte

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 01:31 PM

As co-Founder and Head of Historical Research for Spirit Research Team of Florida, I find I am being approached almost daily by folks that have never joined a team or had any kind of investigative experience under their belts, but feel moved to seek out someone willing to teach. This may be due in part to the influx of Hollywood exposure (such as TAPS and Ghost Hunter) has brought to the table.

I look for experienced people to hold key positions within our organization, but I also welcome 'newbies', provided that it is understood that they must log a certain amount of hours researching areas that they know little about before being allowed on site. I direct them here to GhostVillage and to About.com's paranormal pages as a great resource for learning, as well as answer their questions myself. I tell them to absorb everything and when they've exhausted all the links and materials, come see me for more.

I look for all the qualities already mentioned and one that wasn't.

They must have a level head and be able to react accordingly in any given situation. What benefit are you to a team of researchers and investigators if you run screaming from the site because you mistook cobwebs brushing you as a ghost touching you? Or given there is postive activity, you lose your nerve and abandon your post while the meters and cameras go unmanned and evidence undocumented. :) It may seem that this should go without saying, but I am amazed at the number of times I've witnessed just that.

The faint of heart and nerves of jelly need not apply.

I also find that filling certain positions with those that choose not to go onsite, but like to analyze data, very helpful. I have an Audio Analyst that will disect an EVP down to the milisecond but that I could never get to go onsite. Same thing with one of my Historical Researchers. Turn her loose with an address or one fact and she will uncover loads of info, but you may as well forget about asking her to go to the local cemetery. :lol:

It takes all kinds, to be sure. I am hoping to use unconventional means to build a top-notch team, so far with great results!
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#9 Andi

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 01:54 PM

I always feel that these investigative teams always lack someone very important.... someone who can actually clear the spirit from the home or land.

It's frustrating to no end when I watch one of these shows on tv or hear a story from an invenstigative team about how they have all of this evidence and photos and recordings, etc.... then they just tell the homeowner, "Yep.. you gotta ghost. Bye"

Maybe it's because I do clearings that I'm sensitive to this overlooked little detail, but it just makes sense to offer a solution to the person's problem rather than to just confirm that what they've been experiencing is real and then leave. It just helps them to understand the "who's and why's" of their situation and completes the puzzle for them if they're offered information about the spirits themselves and why they were doing what they were doing. I'm sure it helps them to sleep better at night too!

Just my 2 cents.
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#10 lorddraven2000

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 09:29 PM

I am the director of my group and when I get an application for a new member I look for a reliable person, someone who is going to present themselves professionally at all times and someone who is going to be able to review findings unbiased. I want someone who will not accept everything as paranormal but is open minded enough to admit something is.

#11 Chedwick

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 02:06 PM

Wow, so much information...
I'm glad I'm a sponge...
and like research/history/historical things....

;)
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#12 lorddraven2000

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 11:04 PM

I think you really need compatible people on a team or you are going to get serious delimas that will hinder your work

#13 CajunKnight

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 11:28 PM

Well I have tried lots of ways to determine who is on the team and who is not. I have found that basic gut instinct works best. yes you want people that are qualified mentally and physically. But who are we to say what qualifies a person as a paranormal investigator. You need people you can work with of course. But remember to keep it professional. There is no room for friendships if it gets in the way of what you are doing.
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#14 lorddraven2000

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 03:21 AM

I agree, esp. as a director of a team. Sometimes you really have to step away from the relationship you have with your team to see that a job gets done the right way. Be friends but don't let that get in the way of the goal.

#15 DarkAngel3X3

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 03:26 AM

As co-Founder and Head of Historical Research for Spirit Research Team of Florida, I find I am being approached almost daily by folks that have never joined a team or had any kind of investigative experience under their belts, but feel moved to seek out someone willing to teach.  This may be due in part to the influx of Hollywood exposure (such as TAPS and Ghost Hunter) has brought to the table.

I look for experienced people to hold key positions within our organization, but I also welcome 'newbies', provided that it is understood that they must log a certain amount of hours researching areas that they know little about before being allowed on site.  I direct them here to GhostVillage and to About.com's paranormal pages as a great resource for learning, as well as answer their questions myself.  I tell them to absorb everything and when they've exhausted all the links and materials, come see me for more.

I look for all the qualities already mentioned and one that wasn't.

They must have a level head and be able to react accordingly in any given situation.  What benefit are you to a team of researchers and investigators if you run screaming from the site because you mistook cobwebs brushing you as a ghost touching you?  Or given there is postive activity, you lose your nerve and abandon your post while the meters and cameras go unmanned and evidence undocumented.  :P  It may seem that this should go without saying, but I am amazed at the number of times I've witnessed just that.

The faint of heart and nerves of jelly need not apply.

I also find that filling certain positions with those that choose not to go onsite, but like to analyze data, very helpful.  I have an Audio Analyst that will disect an EVP down to the milisecond but that I could never get to go onsite.  Same thing with one of my Historical Researchers.  Turn her loose with an address or one fact and she will uncover loads of info, but you may as well forget about asking her to go to the local cemetery. ;)

It takes all kinds, to be sure.  I am hoping to use unconventional means to build a top-notch team, so far with great results!

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