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#1 supervince1990

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 08:44 AM

hi all

 

i have just bought a emf reader and am looking at getting a evm recorder and a night vision or infra red camera what would be the best for this sort of thing hat can be good but in a budget 

 

thanks vince



#2 CaveRat2

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 11:17 AM

No single answer for a general question like this.  To begin with, "best" is a subjective term.  It depends on exactly what you want to do with a piece of equipment.  Consider just an EMF meter;  They cover a wide spectrum of frequencies, which band do you want to monitor?  Also, consider single axis sensor versus triaxial, The single axis sensor is directional; the triaxial is not.  So when you want a genral meter I recommend trixial since a single axis meter may miss fields unless the meter is properly oriented in teh field.  And since we never know the direction of a field that becomes a problem if simply looking for fields.

Recorders are another issue.  there are numerous brands out there, some suitable for EVP work, others are junk.  The best way to determine whether one you are considering is good is to check its specs and see if it meets specs.  The minimum specs for EVP work are:

1 - Recorder must sample at 96 KBPS or higher.

2 - Recorder must use a 24 Bit A to D converter (16 bit is insufficient)

3 - Recorder must record using a non-lossy format.  (WAV files, not MP3 or other such compressed format)

4 - Recorder uses PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) algorythm, not the more compressed CELP method.

5 - Recorder records in stereo for redundency.

If your recorder meets these specs it's satisfactory for basic EVP research.

 

Finally IR or night vision cameras.  These are not cheap regardless.  Proper use of IR photography requires the use of special lenses since light refraction is different at IR wavelengths than at visible light.  Otherwise what you get are the fuzzy pictures that most TV shows have when they use inferior equipment.  To properly do IR photography, expect to drop around $1,000 on a camera and lens for basic use, and expect prices to go up as you add options.   If that is a bit over the top, you are much better to simply stay with visible light cameras and use  conventional methods.  After all, who says you have to turn out the lights and go dark anyway?   Just because TV shows do it for dramatic effect doesn't mean that is the way a good investigation is conducted.  I have been doing this for about 40 years and can say probably 80% of my investigations are done in daytime, and even those at night are usually done "lights on".  The ONLY exception would be a case where the witness states and can provide evidence that lights must be off to get results.  After all, where do the ghosts go in daytime?  If you are going to encounter one light or dark makes no real difference.  But if you handicap yourself by turnining off all the lights one thing IS certain....  The possibility of false positives goes up greatly.



#3 Mr Zeta

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 02:18 PM

Hello,

 

Night work is good in the sense that night pictures have less 'noise' in them. You can also co-add a series of pictures - this is done in astronomy to find fainter stars; I happen to be an amateur astronomer.

 

I dont have alot of experience yet in video work - full spectrum, light and laser work are my interests - as far as IR - why people think that spirits are 'cold' I dunno - the problem with detectors is not sensitivity but responsitivity; they need to be 'FAST'; most IR stuff probly isnt fast I would not go there until you get results from other basic tools first; meaning you know or feel you recorded something you cant figure out; like a voice answering a question you asked or spoke yer name etc.

 

I also use Amazon now and stay away from Ebay - give Amazon yer credit card simple as pie - Ebay is too mangled using Paypal and other schemes I am not liking them anymore; Amazon is so user friendly; most stuff is going there now anyways.

 

You can get all this stuff from China - cheap ! I bought is IR cam for like $40 I think (just a cam); shop around and good luck !

 

Mr Zeta



#4 CaveRat2

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 10:41 AM

Actually the noise level in photos goes up as light decreases.  The way astronomers get around that is to cool the imagers using various methods.  (Professional grade CCD imaging actually cools to just above absolute zero.)   I don't know of any paranormal researcher using that method!   Layering techniques do work though, and a series of iamges layered will have a better quality than a single image.  But many paranormal events are fleeting, and the possibility of layering becomes problematic due to the limited number of images available.

 

Stuff from China is cheap, but having dealt with that source before one must be careful.  In some non-critical applications there may be no issues.  but specs can vary widely, and quality may at times be an issue.  So while one may save money, one must also be careful to be sure what you get is in fact quality merchandise.   Sometimes it is and other times.....






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