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Digital Full Spectrum Cameras....


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#1 Joven76

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Posted 14 July 2008 - 07:49 PM

I was curious if anyone here has ever used a Digital Full Spectrum camera like the one they were using on GHI just the other night... I'd like to hear what results you've had...

Also, Barry said he built this camera... If anyone has ever done something like this before, can you share your knowledge on how to do this??? Thanks...

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#2 RON3002

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 09:05 AM

I also would like a little more information,if anyone has any.
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#3 CaveRat2

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 09:42 AM

I would not recommend the use of any "full spectrum" camera. Instead, if you are going outside the visible spectrum I would advise using separate camras, each equipped with filters to cover the spectrum you desire. Reason is if you capture something it will be difficult to determine its source. Separate cameras will allow you to isolate whether it is visible light, UV, or IR in nature. If you use a single camera this may not be possible since the source wavelength will be unknown.
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#4 Joven76

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 10:24 AM

That's a good point... Should have thought of that...
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#5 DeadTrish

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 06:37 AM

I would not recommend the use of any "full spectrum" camera. Instead, if you are going outside the visible spectrum I would advise using separate camras, each equipped with filters to cover the spectrum you desire. Reason is if you capture something it will be difficult to determine its source. Separate cameras will allow you to isolate whether it is visible light, UV, or IR in nature. If you use a single camera this may not be possible since the source wavelength will be unknown.


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#6 sdGH_Tech

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 10:15 PM

For those of us who can't spare to filter multiple cameras in one set-up but still wish to experiment, can someone answer the original poster's question?

I would not recommend the use of any "full spectrum" camera. Instead, if you are going outside the visible spectrum I would advise using separate camras, each equipped with filters to cover the spectrum you desire. Reason is if you capture something it will be difficult to determine its source. Separate cameras will allow you to isolate whether it is visible light, UV, or IR in nature. If you use a single camera this may not be possible since the source wavelength will be unknown.



#7 SacPar

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 04:24 PM

Barry said he had a couple guys work on the camera. I can't remember the component added, but it's difficult and apparently they wrecked some $600 cameras in the process. He mentioned that they are looking into importing the cameras but cant due to US law.

Considering spilling glass making secrets could get you tried for treason until the 1960's, it is possible. On a side note, the FS camera made an annoying blinking that was picked up by the IR on our camcorder.

#8 CaveRat2

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 04:36 PM

This is one of those projects that is not cheap. You mentionj not wanting to filter a camera. I assume cost of filters is an issue. But consider that a full spectrum camera would not be a cheap device either. And regular cameras don't have the ability to go into the UV and iR regions nearly as well as those designed for such use. So either way it's not a cheap venture. Possibly rewarding, but not cheap.
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#9 drflavio309

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 09:11 PM

http://www.lifepixel.com/
this company does conversions to full sprectrum ....
thought I would pass it on...
the dr.,

#10 darktoad

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 05:10 PM

The Fuji S3 UVIR is a "full-spectrum" digital SLR, that is considered suitable for forensic photography and should therefore be fine for ghost hunting purposes.

See review: http://diglloyd.com/...tml#Conclusions

You'll still need filters to isolate the spectrum you want to shoot in. Filters being what they are could be held in front of the lense and not actually screwed in if you wanted to swap from IR to UV in rapid succession, though it could create unacceptable visual artifacts. Note that this camera and the filters are not very cheap. You're probably looking at about $1,500+ to get a decent setup.

Caverat is correct that the ideal rig would require multiple cameras with multiple configurations placed in multiple locations. Synchronizing these is a tricky and costly affair...and you're only hitting one room at a time for a fairly extended period (maybe using a motion sensor trigger, plus a wide angle lens to grab more of the room).

#11 PhenomInvestigator

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 11:49 AM

Having now done some research and spoken with various people actually involved in modifying these cameras, I can report a few more facts.

First the lens will be the biggest single issue. While many cameras when modified will in fact work from the near-IR through the visible to the near-UV range, the greatest limiting factor will be the response of the lens. Most standard lenses are coated and therefore tend to attenuate non-visible light to a degree. If you are serious about capturing especially in the UV range you will find that most cameras have very limited reponse in this area. You will also find that most optical glass will actually admit IR light, even in filters designed to reject or block IR. While some filters do exist that will block most all the IR light, most will not. Most cameras are more sensitive to the IR spectrum than the UV; even IR blocking filters often pass IR light in the near IR region. For this reason it is often necessary to use a UV pass filter in combination with another filter that reduces IR transmission in the low end of the IR region.

The camera detectors do range in spectral response as well. A surprising finding is that the Nikon D90 actually does pretty well in the UV, while the much-touted Fuji Sx series is not as capable, at least in independent tests. Also the Fuji sacrifices the amount of time you can run in Live Preview mode. This is important because you need to be able to see the signal from the sensors in order to focus. The minute you attach a filter over the lens which blocks visible light, a purely optical viewfinder will fail to allow you to see the scene. This used to be much more of a problem than it is today, but it is important to check on this, especially if you intend to shoot UV only.

I have chosen the Nikon D90 as my base camera. I am using a quartz lens from UKA Optics with a response from 200 nm through 1200 nm, which is beyond the limits of most all the normally available UVIR cameras including those manufactured as such. I am using a UV pass filter which is quite unique in that it does not exhibit the usual rise in the near IR that most others do. And I'm using bandpass filters for the IR and Visible spectra so that shooting in all these regions, with and without visible is possible. This kit costs about $3,500 US complete including shipping.

These cameras will get quite a good shakedown in the coming months, as we are about to study some quite active sites all across the U.S.
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#12 MowMowsGirl

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Posted 05 August 2009 - 06:13 PM

I just got my full spectrum camera back from LifePixel, and the lens from coastal optics UV-IR-VIS lens, is on the way, and I have all the filters I need. Now I need a light source. Any idea where to find the UV light source?? Thanks! Stacy >^.,.^<

Having now done some research and spoken with various people actually involved in modifying these cameras, I can report a few more facts.

First the lens will be the biggest single issue. While many cameras when modified will in fact work from the near-IR through the visible to the near-UV range, the greatest limiting factor will be the response of the lens. Most standard lenses are coated and therefore tend to attenuate non-visible light to a degree. If you are serious about capturing especially in the UV range you will find that most cameras have very limited reponse in this area. You will also find that most optical glass will actually admit IR light, even in filters designed to reject or block IR. While some filters do exist that will block most all the IR light, most will not. Most cameras are more sensitive to the IR spectrum than the UV; even IR blocking filters often pass IR light in the near IR region. For this reason it is often necessary to use a UV pass filter in combination with another filter that reduces IR transmission in the low end of the IR region.

The camera detectors do range in spectral response as well. A surprising finding is that the Nikon D90 actually does pretty well in the UV, while the much-touted Fuji Sx series is not as capable, at least in independent tests. Also the Fuji sacrifices the amount of time you can run in Live Preview mode. This is important because you need to be able to see the signal from the sensors in order to focus. The minute you attach a filter over the lens which blocks visible light, a purely optical viewfinder will fail to allow you to see the scene. This used to be much more of a problem than it is today, but it is important to check on this, especially if you intend to shoot UV only.

I have chosen the Nikon D90 as my base camera. I am using a quartz lens from UKA Optics with a response from 200 nm through 1200 nm, which is beyond the limits of most all the normally available UVIR cameras including those manufactured as such. I am using a UV pass filter which is quite unique in that it does not exhibit the usual rise in the near IR that most others do. And I'm using bandpass filters for the IR and Visible spectra so that shooting in all these regions, with and without visible is possible. This kit costs about $3,500 US complete including shipping.

These cameras will get quite a good shakedown in the coming months, as we are about to study some quite active sites all across the U.S.


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#13 CaveRat2

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 03:34 PM

Not sure exactly what your specification needs are, but you might try Cole-Parmer. They carry an assortment of different types of UV lights and filters. You can get more information on individual manufaturers from listings in their catalog.

www.cole-parmer.com

You can get a free catalog from them which may help you in your research. They specialize in lab and research equipment. Go to the website and request a catalog.
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#14 grimshawl

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 09:55 AM

this is a great topic I have been doing a little research on this as well and the posters here are very well educated on the subject. There seems to be alot of interest in this subject and not alot of info in general. Thanks
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#15 Ten301

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 10:24 AM

www.moditronic.com

I have some of their equipment, and it works as advertised. I especially like their UV/IR Full Spectrum Camcorder. You can see a photo I took at the St. Augustine lighthouse laqst month over on mypara.net




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