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Incandescent Black Light...


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#1 Joven76

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Posted 18 October 2008 - 11:10 PM

I've seen a couple of posts before about using an incandescent black light bulb during investigations as a poor man's IR light... So I tested this idea, and wow the difference it made... All I used was a reflector set up you can get at any hardware store, Walmart, Target, etc and a black light incandescent bulb... I've told a few people about this, but everyone wanted to see it in action... So I created a video that shows what the effect is when this setup is used... You can see the video here... If you have a problem viewing the video, give it a couple of minutes to download the video and try it again...

Enjoy...

Christopher

PS: This is my first attempt at putting together a video like this, so please be gentle... And yes, I know that an incandescent black light is not IR light... LOL

Edited by Joven76, 18 October 2008 - 11:12 PM.

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#2 RON3002

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 08:25 AM

Are fellow member C_Tanner mentions it and alot of other great ideas in his book on ghost hunting equipment without going broke
RON

#3 Joven76

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 08:56 AM

I actually saw this in one of his posts... I went back and looked at the video and realized that I didn't use the one where I have credits... I thanked him for this idea... I'll have to republish that one and post it to the site... In the mean time, I thank Chris Tanner of Central Ohio Paranormal Society for passing this idea along... Thanks!!!
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#4 CaveRat2

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 09:23 AM

As you mention the black light is not IR light. Consequently while the effects are similar in that the camera with its wider spectrum will respond to light outside the visible spectrum it will not respond equally. Certain materials may be visible under IR that are not seen using black light, and the reverse is also true. To obtain a full response you need to consider both full more complete coverage.

This is also why the scene is illuminated much better under black light than IR, the black light operates in a portion of the spectrum much closer to visible light than the IR night vision. Thus the camera is more sensitive to that area. If one were to use a camera with its imaging adapted and modified for operation in the IR region the opposite effect would be noted, that being the IR would work better than black light.

So in conclusion both methods serve their purpose and both might be utilized in an investigation.

#5 HRPRG_Belinda

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 12:36 AM

I'm just wondering wouldn't using a light source of any sort compromise the infrared light? I mean I thought we are using infrared to see things that can't be seen with our eyes and by introducing light that our eyes can see doesn't that kinda defeat the purpose of spending all this money ot have true infrared?

#6 CaveRat2

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 04:40 PM

I'm just wondering wouldn't using a light source of any sort compromise the infrared light? I mean I thought we are using infrared to see things that can't be seen with our eyes and by introducing light that our eyes can see doesn't that kinda defeat the purpose of spending all this money ot have true infrared?


It could compromise the situation, however there are actually two methods that can be used to photograph in a particular portion of the spectrum. Suppose you wanted to photogragh an object's IR properties. You could use an IR light source and take a picture using a camera which responds to all portions of the spectrum. Since it was illuminated using only IR, the reaction would be to only IR light.

Another option is to illuminate using all of the light spectrum including IR. Then using a camera fitted with an IR pass filter take the picture. Only the portion of the light within the IR spectrum would reach the film (or CCD) thus only the IR would be seen.

It sounds as though the results would be the same, but not necessarly. Consider that some materials have different properties of refraction. that is why certain materials irredesce under certain types of light. Thus characteristics can vary depending on the material present. Exactly how is a function of the camera, light source, and material composisition of the subject. Any or all of these can affect the results. Keep in mind too that many cameras are sensitive outside the spectrum where our eyes operate so results in a photo may be different than what is seen visibly.

#7 cayen1234

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 01:23 PM

well it's a new way to try to get UV light (which is what a true black light casts) to help IR.
I think it would be better if you actually turned the lightbulbs into filters for your camera and shooting in UV light. I'm actually working on filters for both UV and IR right now that are easy to use.

#8 Kent

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 09:47 PM

I've never used black light from anything paranormal.. But I did discover that the little X10 Xcam2 video cameras see in black light quite well...
KentLondon, Ontario




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