Jump to content


Click Here To Visit Our Sponsor


Photo
- - - - -

Ion Meter - NOT Ion Counter


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 GPPI_JMe

GPPI_JMe

    Junior Villager

  • New Member
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ICT, Ks

Posted 19 February 2008 - 09:30 PM

Hello all! I can honestly say that this portion of the forum is by far the best - being the tech geek that I am.. ;D

I thought I'd run an idea by you guys, and see what you think. About a year ago I ran across a guy online who was talking about how the "cheap" smoke detectors work, and the possibility of hooking one up to a multimeter. In theory this device would then read the voltage level of the ionic level in the room.

Now, try to keep up with me here - this is not going to count the number of negative or positive ions in a room. In order to understand exactly how this is going to work, you must first understand how a smoke detector, that utilizes an ionization chamber, works. When smoke travels through this chamber, it disrupts the current ionization process taking place in the chamber, resulting in a voltage drop that signals the alarm to go off.

So, basically when the circuit board of the smoke detector is connected properly to the positive and negative wires of the multi meter, it gives you the current voltage level of ions in the room. Say a mass of negative ions were to "travel" into the room - this would result in a voltage drop on the meter, right? Note: You wont get an exact ion count out of this little device, but you also wont have to spend $600 to buy/make one of these either. It's also best to stand still when checking the voltage level, or just set the meter in an "active" location and monitor it from there. Moving it around wildly will jar the readout, much like waving around a thermo coupler to produce false positive results (i.e. "making a cold spot").

We have been using one on our investigations now for several months, and have had luck several times with it during situations where activity seems to have taken a "paranormal" twist. Random EMF spikes with no localized source? Check the ion meter. Is it fluctuating like crazy? Take a picture. Switch on your recorder. Who knows what you might get.

Thoughts? Suggestions? Constructive criticism?

*Disclaimer* First, I'm not going to straight up tell you this will work as a piece of paranormal investigative equipment. However, none of the equipment we use was designed specifically for paranormal investigation, so what could it hurt to try something else? Second, there is a small piece of radioactive material (Americium 241) inside the ionization chamber. It is low enough in radioactivity that it is harmless when exposed from the outer casing of the smoke detector. (However do not ingest this material, touch it purposely, or even remove it from the ionization chamber. There is no need to do so - so leave-it-be inside its chamber.)
Posted ImagePosted Image

#2 optimusprime

optimusprime

    Junior Villager

  • New Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Location:middlefield ct

Posted 23 February 2008 - 05:23 PM

Hello all! I can honestly say that this portion of the forum is by far the best - being the tech geek that I am.. ;D

I thought I'd run an idea by you guys, and see what you think. About a year ago I ran across a guy online who was talking about how the "cheap" smoke detectors work, and the possibility of hooking one up to a multimeter. In theory this device would then read the voltage level of the ionic level in the room.

Now, try to keep up with me here - this is not going to count the number of negative or positive ions in a room. In order to understand exactly how this is going to work, you must first understand how a smoke detector, that utilizes an ionization chamber, works. When smoke travels through this chamber, it disrupts the current ionization process taking place in the chamber, resulting in a voltage drop that signals the alarm to go off.

So, basically when the circuit board of the smoke detector is connected properly to the positive and negative wires of the multi meter, it gives you the current voltage level of ions in the room. Say a mass of negative ions were to "travel" into the room - this would result in a voltage drop on the meter, right? Note: You wont get an exact ion count out of this little device, but you also wont have to spend $600 to buy/make one of these either. It's also best to stand still when checking the voltage level, or just set the meter in an "active" location and monitor it from there. Moving it around wildly will jar the readout, much like waving around a thermo coupler to produce false positive results (i.e. "making a cold spot").

We have been using one on our investigations now for several months, and have had luck several times with it during situations where activity seems to have taken a "paranormal" twist. Random EMF spikes with no localized source? Check the ion meter. Is it fluctuating like crazy? Take a picture. Switch on your recorder. Who knows what you might get.

Thoughts? Suggestions? Constructive criticism?

*Disclaimer* First, I'm not going to straight up tell you this will work as a piece of paranormal investigative equipment. However, none of the equipment we use was designed specifically for paranormal investigation, so what could it hurt to try something else? Second, there is a small piece of radioactive material (Americium 241) inside the ionization chamber. It is low enough in radioactivity that it is harmless when exposed from the outer casing of the smoke detector. (However do not ingest this material, touch it purposely, or even remove it from the ionization chamber. There is no need to do so - so leave-it-be inside its chamber.)



http://www.amazing1.com/ion-gun.htm
Check that out .Is this what you are talking about a static field detector negative ion detector ?
If so i maybe getting one if i dont end up getting the actual ion counter . but im anxios to see you post a picture of what your talking about .
Posted Image

#3 GPPI_JMe

GPPI_JMe

    Junior Villager

  • New Member
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ICT, Ks

Posted 23 February 2008 - 10:37 PM

What an awesome find. That's very similiar to what I'm talking about - however my unit doesn't have a sensitivity adjustment option, nor an "electrical" level sensor. This multimeter / circuit board combo ran me about $16.

I'll try to post a picture or two of this model.
Posted ImagePosted Image

#4 optimusprime

optimusprime

    Junior Villager

  • New Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Location:middlefield ct

Posted 23 February 2008 - 11:44 PM

What an awesome find. That's very similiar to what I'm talking about - however my unit doesn't have a sensitivity adjustment option, nor an "electrical" level sensor. This multimeter / circuit board combo ran me about $16.

I'll try to post a picture or two of this model.


Yeah im into this tech stuff also , im good with comming up with ideas on how stuff can work and finding the parts but im no builder . Check this guys site out hes got some pretty interesting equipment ,not yet available to the public yet but im keeping in contact with him for when he relases it later this year. http://www.paradoxel...s.com/index.htm

Edited by optimusprime, 23 February 2008 - 11:45 PM.

Posted Image

#5 GPPI_JMe

GPPI_JMe

    Junior Villager

  • New Member
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ICT, Ks

Posted 25 February 2008 - 07:32 AM

Thanks. I'll definitely check it out!
Posted ImagePosted Image

#6 optimusprime

optimusprime

    Junior Villager

  • New Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Location:middlefield ct

Posted 01 March 2008 - 11:06 AM

Ive decided that the Ion counter is out of my price range for now bummer,but im getting that Ion detector soon. I read that after spending 400-500 you gotta plug those Ion counters into a ground of some sorts which to me sounds kind of wacky LOL .That means your restricted to that area and can't move around.
Posted Image




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users