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#1 Crone

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Posted 23 September 2006 - 10:41 PM

We caught part of Saving Private Ryan this morning, and that prompted my sister and I to think about out visit to Normandy Beach in 1984. She was with her high school French class, and I was one of the chaperones. We were able to go into one of the bunkers there which had been used, among other things, as a place to store some of the bodies of the soldiers that had been killed there. There was still traces of blood on the walls. We agreed that the energy in that area was the most profound we had ever experienced. As my sister said, if you didn't believe in ghosts before, you would after visiting Normandy Beach. It was as if you could feel the spirits of all of those guys right there next to you. Knowing that our mother's cousin had been killed there brought it even closer to home.

Edited by Crone, 26 September 2006 - 05:17 PM.

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#2 Ambra

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 09:44 PM

I've always wanted to go to Normandy; my great-uncle was part of the D-Day invasion and I live about an hour-and-a-half from the National D-Day Memorial in Bedford, VA, which was chosen because it lost more hometown soldiers per capita than any other city in the US. My great-uncle survived that bloody day only to be killed the following Febuary, just weeks before the war ended. With all the violence and emotional turmoil that took place that day, I'm sure the place is paranormally charged.
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#3 DukeofBoogie

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 09:04 AM

I don't really have much urge to go to France, but Normady, I would like to visit, just to pay my respsect to the brave men that fought there.
http://www.facebook....59567008?v=wallhttp://www.cdbaby.co...eblackriverboyshttp://www.zoarcivilwar.com/In great deeds something abides. On great fields something stays.....Spirits linger, to consecrate ground for the vision place of souls. And reverent men and women from afar, and generations that know us not and that we know not of, heart-drawn to where and by whom great things were suffered and done for them, shall come to this deathless field, to ponder and dream; and lo! The shadow of a mighty presence shall wrap them in its bosom, and the power of the vision pass into thier soles.-Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain


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#4 Richard Kimmel

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 03:12 PM

I have interesting artifact, with a Paranormal connection, from the Normandy Invasion on my website. Click below "Visit My Website".

Richard

Edited by Richard Kimmel, 07 August 2007 - 03:13 PM.

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#5 Zulphur

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 12:43 PM

I have interesting artifact, with a Paranormal connection, from the Normandy Invasion on my website. Click below "Visit My Website".

Richard


I have never been to Normandy but as have a huge interest in WWII I just have to go soon!.
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#6 Mark London

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 01:19 PM

Hey there

I absolutely loved going to Normandy, I have been there three times over the years, I also attended the 60th Anniversary.

What interests me is not only the beaches, but the inlaying villages, as some of them still have bullet holes in the walls, and bomb damage, absolutely fascinating !

There are also many many cemetries dedicated and have men buried there from all countries. I must say the American one was the most impressive, although sad, and you just cant feel not humbled by the whole experience.

Both my Grandfathers served in the British Army and both were involved in the D-Day landings on Sword Beach.

Id recommend it to anyone !

Mark :hug:

#7 rayzrwyre

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 07:42 AM

My one grandfather flew top turret in a B17G, 50 missions, during WWII, the other a PYT Catalina in the Pacific, same war. Both of the contributions, and the huge sacrifice made by every soldier, American and British, was the driving force of why i joined the Army and served for eight years. Not that I advocate war and the destruction that typically follows it; as Mark and others from the Isle can tell you, London was very close to be anhilated. But without each individual contribution to the cause of stopping the Axis powers, how different would our world be today? I shudder to imagine it!

I am proud to have served my country! I recall watching Saving Private Ryan in a theater full of soldiers when it came out. Not one dry eye left that night. I would love to one day walk along the same sand at Normandy that my fellow countrymen did many decades ago. I hope to feel there spirits, even their pain, for the price that they paid in blood afforded us all a life of freedom.

To that extent, I salute them! Heroes through all time!

Edited by rayzrwyre, 14 August 2007 - 07:45 AM.

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#8 Steph K

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 10:39 AM

In doing research, I would like to go to the POW camp where my grandpa was at after being captured. Moosburg Stalag 7. I also would like to visit Anzio Italy where he was captured. I am a World War 2 buff, but more to the European war than the Japanese one. It is my dream to visit Aushwitz. I have heard so many stories about the energy that resides there. After watching Saving Private Ryan I am sure that Normandy Beach has a lot more to offer spiritually than before the movie. I can still see the life-like battle in my head.

#9 parawika

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 08:02 PM

In 1984, I was serving with the 82nd Abn Div out of Ft. Bragg and had the opportunity to participate in the 40th D-Day Anniversary which involved a Task Force from our Division jumping first into the UK and linking with the British Parachute Regiment and with some of them joining us, turning around and jumping onto our old combat drop zones around St. Mere Eglise which was the first town liberated by the Allies on the European mainland during WW2. This was the first time a unit from the 82nd had returned to Normandy and on 5 June, 1984, we jumped into a drop zone by parachute that was just a few miles east of St. Mere Eglise, between the town and the Utah landing beaches and we were then bussed over to a location which was known as "Timme's Orchards" where a regimental commander of the 507th Parachute Regiment had started his fight out of after landing there. For anyone familiar with the geography of that area, this was just across from the River Dives, west of the La Fiere bridge/causeway and west of St. Mere Eglise.
After arriving there that evening, we made arrangement to sleep outside that night there in that farm orchard. Later on after it was dark, we held a memorial service at midnight, in the dark, complete with the playing of taps and one of our chaplains telling us that 40 years ago at that moment, there were American Paratroopers who were quietly descending down where we were standing to start the fight to kick the Germans out of France and end the war. Nothing really mysterious happened at that instance, but in the dark there that night, you couldn't help but feel that you weren't alone, like the ghosts of old paratroopers were there with you in the night.
For anyone interested, I recommend a reading of SLA Marshall's Night Drop: The American Airborne Invasion of Normandy for a history of that area and the paratroopers who fought there. We were actually required to buy a copy and read it before we flew over and jumped into there. We ended up visiting just about every battlefield or historical site mentioned in that book.

#10 civilwarbuff

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 09:40 AM

In 1984, I was serving with the 82nd Abn Div out of Ft. Bragg and had the opportunity to participate in the 40th D-Day Anniversary which involved a Task Force from our Division jumping first into the UK and linking with the British Parachute Regiment and with some of them joining us, turning around and jumping onto our old combat drop zones around St. Mere Eglise which was the first town liberated by the Allies on the European mainland during WW2. This was the first time a unit from the 82nd had returned to Normandy and on 5 June, 1984, we jumped into a drop zone by parachute that was just a few miles east of St. Mere Eglise, between the town and the Utah landing beaches and we were then bussed over to a location which was known as "Timme's Orchards" where a regimental commander of the 507th Parachute Regiment had started his fight out of after landing there. For anyone familiar with the geography of that area, this was just across from the River Dives, west of the La Fiere bridge/causeway and west of St. Mere Eglise.
After arriving there that evening, we made arrangement to sleep outside that night there in that farm orchard. Later on after it was dark, we held a memorial service at midnight, in the dark, complete with the playing of taps and one of our chaplains telling us that 40 years ago at that moment, there were American Paratroopers who were quietly descending down where we were standing to start the fight to kick the Germans out of France and end the war. Nothing really mysterious happened at that instance, but in the dark there that night, you couldn't help but feel that you weren't alone, like the ghosts of old paratroopers were there with you in the night.
For anyone interested, I recommend a reading of SLA Marshall's Night Drop: The American Airborne Invasion of Normandy for a history of that area and the paratroopers who fought there. We were actually required to buy a copy and read it before we flew over and jumped into there. We ended up visiting just about every battlefield or historical site mentioned in that book.


all i can say is WOW! what an experience. shakes your hand to say "thank you for serving." i say that to all of our vets.
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#11 civilwarbuff

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 09:45 AM

i would like to visit a POW camp also.my great uncle was captured in poland and walked to his concentration camp for soldiers only.he was told not to look up but to look down.but he looked up a few times to see smoke stacks.they were burning too.he didnt know what they were at the time.he was captured by the nazis during the end of the war.in 1944.hes still alive.hes in his 90s now.he told me about how they tried to have escape plans.escape routes in the bread.or in the playing cards they would have codes.i dont know the actual camps name.but.......still very sad.
when sliding down the bannister of life, may the splinters never point the wrong way...an irish blessing.......may those that love us, love us, as for those that dont love us, may God turn their hearts.and if God cant turn their hearts, may God turn their ankles, so we will know them by their limp.




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