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The Vampire


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#1 Vampchick21

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 09:21 PM

I'll bet many folks here were wondering when I'd get around to this....lol.

Found the quoted bit from THIS website (and the whole website in general) interesting.

Vampire "species"

In Eastern Europe, the vampire is said to have two hearts or two souls; because one heart or soul never dies, the vampire remains undead. Until recently, European vampires were thought to be disgusting monsters often raised from the bodies of peasants and other lower-class people. John William Polidori's Lord Ruthven, featured in his short story The Vampyre and based on Polidori's employer, the famous Romantic poet Lord Byron, was the first recorded vampire to possess intelligence and a kind of preternatural charm; hence, Ruthven could also operate within human society without creating suspicion, as long as his weaknesses are accommodated. Later, Bram Stoker's immensely successful Dracula popularized this new conception of the vampire.

In Aztec mythology, the Civatateo was a sort of vampire, created when a noblewoman died in childbirth.

In Australian aboriginal mythology, the Yara-Ma-Yha-Who (http://www.pantheon....ma-yha-who.html) was a nasty little vampire with suckers on his fingers that lurked in fig trees.

In Malaysian folklore, the Penanggalan was a vampire whose head could separate from its body, with its entrails dangling from the base of its neck. The Pontianak was a female vampire that sucked the blood of newborn babies and sometimes that of young children or pregnant women.

In Philippine folklore, the Manananggal was a female vampire whose entire upper body could separate from her lower body and who could fly using wings. She sucked the blood of fetuses. The Aswang was believed to always be a female of considerable beauty by day and, by night, a fearsome flying fiend. She lived in a house, could marry and have children, and was a seemingly normal human during the daylight hours.

In Bulgaria, a vampire had only one nostril and slept with its left eye open and its thumbs linked. It was also held responsible for cattle plagues.

In Moravia, vampires were fond of throwing off their shrouds and attacking their victims in the nude.

Roma tradition in the Balkans is said to have held that melons and pumpkins may become vampires; see the article on vampire watermelons.

In the Caribbean, vampires known as Soucoyant in Trinidad and Tobago, Ol' Higue in Jamaica and Loogaroo in Grenada take the form of old women during the day, and at night shed their skin to become flying balls of flame who seek blood. They were said to be notoriously obsessive compulsive, and could be thwarted by sprinkling salt or rice at entrances, crossroads and near beds. The vampire would feel compelled to pick up every grain. They could also be killed by rubbing salt into their discarded skin, which would burn them upon returning to it before morning.

In India (especially in the southern state of Kerala) vampires (known as Yakshis) were beautiful women who seduced men in order to kill or eat them. They are said to be averse to iron objects in addition to other religious symbols, and could be killed by driving an iron nail through the head. They could also be imprisoned in trees using blessed objects. India is also home to the vetala, a wraithly vampire that can leave its host body to feed.

And for a woman who likes all things Vampiric...I'd no idea about THIS

William of Newburgh (1136?-1198?) was a 12th century English historian, and monk, from Yorkshire.

His major work was Historia rerum Anglicarum (History of English Affairs), a history of England from 1066 to 1198. The work is valued by historians for detailing the anarchy under Stephen of England. It is written in an engaging fashion and still highly readable to this day, containing many fascinating stories and glimpses in to 12th century medieval life.

Newburgh has been called by Freeman "the father of historical criticism"1. Newburgh saw his own work as being historically accurate, unlike Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the British Kings, which Newburgh was critical of saying "only a person ignorant of ancient history would have any doubt about how shamelessly and impudently he lies in almost everything".2

Because belief in souls returning from the dead was common in the 12th century, Newburghs Historia briefly recants stories he heard about revenants, as does the work of Walter Map, his southern contemporary. Although a minor part of both works, these folklore accounts have attracted attention within occultism.


So, I think I have a link to Newburgh's works online. Over the next few days I'll see if I can find these references that are apparently in Historia rerum Anglicarum and post them here.

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#2 Vampchick21

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 09:31 PM

Found it!!!!

Dead man who wandered about after burial

[1]In these days a wonderful event befell in the county of Buckingham, which I, in the first instance, partially heard from certain friends, and was afterwards more fully informed of by Stephen, the venerable archdeacon of that province. A certain man died, and, according to custom, by the honorable exertion of his wife arid kindred, was laid in the tomb on the eve of the Lord's Ascension. On the following night, however, having entered the bed where his wife was reposing, he not only terrified her on awaking, but nearly crushed her by the insupportable weight of his body. The next night, also, he afflicted the astonished woman in the same manner, who, frightened at the danger, as the struggle of the third night drew near, took care to remain awake herself, and surround herself with watchful companions. Still he came; but being repulsed by the shouts of the watchers, and seeing that he was prevented from doing mischief, he departed. Thus driven off from his wife, he harassed in a similar manner his own brothers, who were dwelling in the same street; but they, following the cautious example of the woman, passed the nights in wakefulness with their companions, ready to meet and repel the expected danger. He appeared, notwithstanding, as if with the hope of surprising them should they be overcome with drowsiness; but being repelled by the carefulness and valor of the watchers, he rioted among the animals, both indoors and outdoors, as their wildness and unwonted movements testified.

[2] Having thus become a like serious nuisance to his friends and neighbors, he imposed upon all the same necessity for nocturnal watchfulness; and in that very street a general watch was kept in every house, each being fearful of his approach unawares. After having for some time rioted in this manner during the night-time alone, he began to wander abroad in daylight, formidable indeed to all, but visible only to a few; for oftentimes, on his encountering a number of persons, he would appear to one or two only though at the same time his presence was not concealed from the rest. At length the inhabitants, alarmed beyond measure, thought it advisable to seek counsel of the church; and they detailed the whole affair, with tearful lamentation, to the above-mentioned archdeacon, at a meeting of the clergy over which he was solemnly presiding. Whereupon he immediately intimated in writing the whole circumstances of the case to the venerable bishop of Lincoln, who was then resident in London, whose opinion and judgment on so unwonted a matter he was very properly of opinion should be waited for: but the bishop, being amazed at his account, held a searching investigation with his companions; and there were some who said that such things had often befallen in England, and cited frequent examples to show that tranquillity could not be restored to the people until the body of this most wretched man were dug up and burnt. This proceeding, however, appeared indecent and improper in the last degree to the reverend bishop, who shortly after addressed a letter of absolution, written with his own hand, to the archdeacon, in order that it might be demonstrated by inspection in what state the body of that man really was; and he commanded his tomb to be opened, and the letter having been laid upon his breast, to be again closed: so the sepulcher having been opened, the corpse was found as it had been placed there, and the charter of absolution having been deposited upon its breast, and the tomb once more closed, he was thenceforth never more seen to wander, nor permitted to inflict annoyance or terror upon any one.


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#3 Vampchick21

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 09:33 PM

And a similar occurance at Berwick

In the northern parts of England, also, we know that another event, not unlike this and equally wonderful, happened about the same time. At the mouth of the river Tweed, and in the jurisdiction of the king of Scotland, there stands a noble city which is called Berwick. In this town a certain man, very wealthy, but as it afterwards appeared a great rogue, having been buried, after his death sallied forth (by the contrivance, as it is believed, of Satan) out of his grave by night, and was borne hither and thither, pursued by a pack of dogs with loud barkings; thus striking great terror into the neighbors, and returning to his tomb before daylight. After this had continued for several days, and no one dared to be found out of doors after dusk -- for each dreaded an encounter with this deadly monster -- the higher and middle classes of the people held a necessary investigation into what was requisite to he done; the more simple among them fearing, in the event of negligence, to be soundly beaten by this prodigy of the grave; but the wiser shrewdly concluding that were a remedy further delayed, the atmosphere, infected and corrupted by the constant whirlings through it of the pestiferous corpse, would engender disease and death to a great extent; the necessity of providing against which was shown by frequent examples in similar cases. They, therefore, procured ten young men renowned for boldness, who were to dig up the horrible carcass, and, having cut it limb from limb, reduce it into food and fuel for the flames. When this was done, the commotion ceased. Moreover, it is stated that the monster, while it was being borne about (as it is said) by Satan, had told certain persons whom it had by chance encountered, that as long as it remained unburned the people should have no peace. Being burnt, tranquility appeared to be restored to them; but a pestilence, which arose in consequence, carried off the greater portion of them: for never did it so furiously rage elsewhere, though it was at that time general throughout all the borders of England, as shall be more fully explained in its proper place.


There seems to be a few scattered throughout the 5 books of his work. Look for titles with the word "prodigies", as these seem to recount these particular occurances.

I'd no idea!

Edited by Vampchick21, 12 September 2005 - 09:34 PM.

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#4 Willow

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 09:52 PM

That's phenomenal Vamp! Alot of good reading i'll be doing tonight and yes, this is the one subject I was anxiously awaiting for someone to start :)

Roma tradition in the Balkans is said to have held that melons and pumpkins may become vampires; see the article on vampire watermelons

In Moravia, vampires were fond of throwing off their shrouds and attacking their victims in the nude.


In Bulgaria, a vampire had only one nostril and slept with its left eye open and its thumbs linked. It was also held responsible for cattle plagues.


These I've never heard of before :weeee:
Either write things worth reading,
Or do things worth the writing.



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#5 MoonChild

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 11:55 PM

wow, that is sure an intresting information! :weeee:
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#6 mellilotflower

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 04:00 AM

The creatures described by Newburough, especially the one in Bukinghamshire remind me of the scandinavian Drauger or Aptrgangr. Which are restless dead, and rise again from the grave. It was said that they were envious of the living and expressed this frustration by killing things. They had great strength and usually killed by crushing their victims. They could also see into the future and change the weather and their own shapes. It apparently took a lot more to subdue a Drauger though than a simple letter on the chest. The Daugre had to be killed by hand to hand combat, once it was subdued it had to be decapitated, sometimes to ensure the seperation of head from body you would have to walk between them three times. A wooden stake would then be driven through the body and the whole lot would be burnt.

The Yakshis seem to have a lot in common with the Boabhan Sith (pronounced Baavan She) the celtic vampire that prayed on small groups of men, often out hunting. They'd dance with them and work themselves up into a frenzy before draining thier blood- but like all the sith they couldn't stand the touch of Iron, and they are said of course to detest christian symbology.

I always found this; http://theshadowlands.net/vamp3.htm to be a very good articile about various vampires throughout the world. It doesn't go in to the details, nor cases but has a good overview.

The point which I should first wish to understand is whether the pious or holy is beloved by the gods because it is holy, or holy because it is beloved of the gods.

Sonnet XCIVBut if that flower with base infection meet,The basest weed outbraves his dignity:For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds

#7 Vampchick21

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 10:15 AM

The interesting thing about kicking off this topic is that I've discovered similar and yet very different Vampire legends from around the world, and from places you'd never think of seeing such.

I had heard a wee blip many years ago about the Celtic Vampire, but not as indepth as you've given us Melliot! And I've not heard of the Scandianvian one before now either.

I'm pulling together a few more things I've found, some stuff on the New England Vampires (such as Mercy Brown) and the thoughts on the cause of those scares from some experts, and a vampire legend from right here in Ontario.

So far it seems to me that there is some kind of need in the human pscye (spelled that wrong), that calls for legends and tales of the dead rising and coming after the living.

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#8 mellilotflower

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 02:52 PM

It's something that I've been noticing for a while now- the odd similarities between the diverse myths (especially in this area ie vampirism) throughout the world. Cross roads are a recurrent theme for one, and I've heard of other obsessive compulsive vampires that had to stop to count grain, or unpick knots. And obviously there's the succubi idea that seems to have made an appearance on every part of the globe at some point or another.
I'd love to hear what you find :drink2:

The point which I should first wish to understand is whether the pious or holy is beloved by the gods because it is holy, or holy because it is beloved of the gods.

Sonnet XCIVBut if that flower with base infection meet,The basest weed outbraves his dignity:For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds

#9 Vampchick21

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 09:14 PM

So far I've found this site on the Wilno Vampire. Wilno is the oldest Polish settlement in Canada. There is some controversy as to whether or not this is a true legend or one told to the researcher that recorded it so that she'd leave people alone. It did make it to an episode of Creepy Canada irregardless.

http://www.pararesea...ilno/wilno.html

Plus a link to the researcher...

http://www.worldhist....-Perkowski.htm

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#10 MoonChild

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Posted 16 September 2005 - 12:01 AM

man! the vampire information is getting intresting! :cheerleader:
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#11 Vampchick21

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 07:32 PM

http://gothlupin.tri...vvampearly.html


    Early vampires date back at least four thousand years, back to ancient Assyrians and Babylonians of Mesopotamia.

    Ekimmu -- a malefic spirit in Assyria that was a cross between a demon and ghost. In addition to ghostly haunting, it often attacked and devoured its victims. Sometimes this creature chose to possess its victims rather than physically devouring them.

    Lamastu (or Lamashtu) was a demon goddess feared by Mesopotamians since she preyed on humans. Her name can be translated to "she who erases". Assyrian legend says she is the daughter of the sky god, Anu. She crept into houses at night to kill babies, in their cribs or in the womb. Thus she was responsible for sudden infant death syndrome and miscarriage. She preyed on adults, too, bringing disease, sterility, nightmare, not to mention sucking blood from young men. She is depicted with wings and birdlike talons, and sometimes with a lion's head.

    Lilitu, closely related to Lamastu, was of Babylonian origin. In ancient Hebrew culture this female demon was called Lilith. Talmudic legend places her as the first wife of Adam, banished from Eden for being the earliest feminist on record by refusing to obey her husband. She was, after all, the original woman (by some accounts), having been created from the earth alongside of Adam.

    Legend and superstition evolved Lilith into a night demon. She flew out of the dark to suck the blood of infants and children. She was blamed for causing men to have erotic dreams in a time when the loss of semen was considered horrific.

    When Christianity ascended one of the many thrones of human belief, early church fathers assigned the Queen of Night her own Army of Hell which waged fierce war on the good. Incubi (male) and succubi (female) were spirits or demons assuming human form to seduce unwilling victims. Interestingly, many a nun or woman of virtue became pregnant this way.

http://gothlupin.tri.../vvampeuro.html

Germany gives us the alp and the neuntoter. The former is a nightmare, bloodsucking demon, which has also been known to suck the nipples of both men and women. The latter has an excremental stench about it and is covered with disfiguring sores. It spreads the plague.

Mara: a demon of Scandinavia similar to many in Europe. She is a beautiful succubus. According to southern Slavs, when a mora (their version of mara) tastes a man's blood, she is so enamored of him that she returns night after night to relentlessly torment his sleep with nightmares.

A Bulgarian version of the vampire has only one nostril and a long, pointed tongue with a barb or sting at the end. The ubour is blamed for freeing cattle and throwing household items, but it is cruel, too, choking people and generally tormenting the living. When not smearing dung on everything, it will eat manure, and even regular food. This creature doesn't need blood unless other nourishment is unobtainable.

The murony is a Romanian vampire (found in Wallachia) that shapeshifts into almost any creature, mammal or bloodsucking insect. Its victims will assume this is a natural creature. Though it completely drains the blood, the expected fang marks won't be found on its victims. Know a murony in its grave by these characteristics: fangs, sharp talons and fresh blood dripping from ears, eyes, nostrils and mouth.



http://gothlupin.tri.../vvampeast.html

Much info at the above link, so easier just to let you guys wander over there :(

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#12 Richv1

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 04:04 PM

Well I used to read every book I could get my hands on about vampires so I am familiar with there being lots of different types from different countries.
My favorite though will always be Bram Stoker's Dracula. He is not a real vampire, he's more like a super vampire. Bram Stoker made him up based LOOSELY on vampire legends.




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#13 Vampchick21

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Posted 21 September 2005 - 09:31 AM

Bram Stoker's Dracula was based partially on Eastern European vampire legends and partially on the real life figure and actions of the Wallchavian Prince Vlad Tepis. It's from this Victorian Gothic novel that many modern day writers have drawn their own vampires from, not to mention movie vampires.

Most folks understand that Bram Stoker's Dracula is a fictional character in a fictional novel though.

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#14 Richv1

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Posted 21 September 2005 - 06:17 PM

Yes I enjoyed reading about Vlad Tepes. I liked all the little stories about how he treats his subjects and visitors. Don't be rude around him. He lived in a hard time and did what he had to to protect his land and people.




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#15 lorddraven2000

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 11:40 PM

I also used to be a major vamp fan but after awhile I got bored with it. I occasionally go back and read a book or two from my collection but mainly focus on my ghost studies, but I have to say this is some amazing info and I thank you for posting it.




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