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Brain Power: Mind Control of External Devices


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#1 spooksareus

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 05:45 AM

A person moving mouse cursor on a computer screen is an insignificant accomplishment. Heck, even a monkey can do it.

But if the person is a quadriplegic controlling the cursor with nothing but brainwaves, now that would be interesting. And it's been done.

Brain-computer interface systems, although still in developmental and experimental stages, are becoming increasingly more powerful and applicable. Advancements in neural signaling research make it one of the hottest fields in biomedical engineering.

Better sensing systems

Earlier this year, researchers indeed trained four people suffering epilepsy to move a computer cursor with the power of thought. The patients, who were waiting to have brain surgery, were already fitted with small sheets of signal-detecting electrodes on the surfaces of their brains.

The patients were asked to perform certain tasks – such as opening and closing their hands and sticking out their tongue – while scientists determined what brain signals were associated with these movements.

Next, the signals from these movements were matched up with movements of the cursor on the screen. For example, the thought of opening of the right hand might move the cursor to the right. The subjects were then asked to move the cursor from one spot to another on the screen by thinking about making the movements.

The patients had some difficulty at first, but each was able to control the cursor with their thoughts and with over 70 percent accuracy after a few minutes. One patient was operating at 100 percent accuracy by the end of the trial.

"All our subjects were able to control the computer cursor using imagined representations of motor movements," said Daniel Moran of Washington University.

This study was the first to prove that sensors placed on the surface of the brain are preferable to the standard forms of sensors – either embedded deep in the brain tissue or worn as a cap. They are less intrusive than an embedded variety and potentially more stable and powerful than the cap, which receives weak brain signals that have passed through the skull.


http://www.livescien..._interface.html

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#2 lulaboo

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 09:41 AM

Pretty cool article Spooks. I remember seeing a short t.v. article on the Science channel about a year ago where they were using the caps to get people to move a computer cursor across the screen. :hug:
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#3 spooksareus

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 09:55 AM

Yep it will be great for those with physical handicaps like my bro in law.
He has very limited movement in his entire body and has been in a wheelchair since he was 10.
Stanford Hospital put him in a full body cast for a year thoroughly imobolized when he was 9, and after they took it off he never walked again.

Every thing that most people take for granted like moving a computer mouse, writing a check or making lunch is a monumental task for him

He's a brilliant guy though, and this kind of thing would make an enormous difference in his life.

"It is perfectly monstrous the way people go about, nowadays, saying things against one behind one's back that are absolutely and entirely true." -Oscar Wilde “The Picture of Dorian Gray”


#4 saakshi

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 11:54 AM

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Hi there
Its amazing what modern science can do...Recently I saw a show the PSI factor ( the chronicles of the paranormal) in AXN channel...It dealt with a story which told how an actual computer virus killed the person working with the computer...I cudnt see the show completely,but is it possible for such a thing to happen,they had classified this as paranormal activity...Do let me knw if u hve heard smething that refers to a similar incident...and also abt what u said abt people being able to control ones senses through these stimulators attached to their brain..SO when it comes to telekinesis what is the actual phenomenon that happens...I would very much appreciate it if u could help me on this...May God Bless, take care and thank u..
Saakshi

#5 evad_83647

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 02:15 PM

question: Wouldn't it be simpler to tap into the nerves at the base of the skull? I had a nerve conduction survey done and she stuck needle into my nerves that made my hands and fingers move without me telling them too. They know where the nerves are because she told me which finger or whatever was going to move before she did it.

Our brains send electrical signals down these corridors to make things work. Why can't we just tap into them as they enter the neck? I know a lot of peole have nerve damage but it is usally lower in the body. My damage is where my neck and spine come together.
Once I get there, there is somewhere else.Is it the beginning of the end or the end of the beginning?




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