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#16 freyjasdottir

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 08:29 PM

Moon, can I move in with you? It's beautiful
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#17 GhostCat

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 08:49 PM

This is an incredible website if you have not heard of it already. It is www.earth.google.com

Once downloaded and download the "free" one. You will see the earth floating in space. You can type in an address, try your own for starters and it will zoom right in on you state, city and keep right on going to see your house, your yard etc. It is an actual satellite image. It is incredible. You can roam the entire world. You don't need an address either, you can just zoom in anywhere over the world and see the world.
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#18 MoonChild

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 12:08 AM

ty Masq.

GhostCat, I have Google Earth, it is quite amazing!

Oh Moon! Cochin is STUNNING!

Yes you are right Vampie, it surely is stunning. Infact the whole of Kerala (the state) is beautiful. They call Kerala the God's Own Country, which is almost true, except for the people and their attitude.

Edited by MoonChild, 27 February 2006 - 12:10 AM.

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#19 MoonChild

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 10:20 AM

My new home: city of Bangalore

The ISCKON Temple
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night traffic
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State Government building
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a garden
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an arial view
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more of Bangalore, later on.

Edited by MoonChild, 13 June 2006 - 12:11 PM.

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#20 jakob493

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 12:08 PM

Wow, I just downloaded that Google Earth, that is AMAZING!! Mostly I've only been in SD but i like to random zoom to places in the US...

#21 Willow

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 12:16 PM

*envies Moon* Thats really gorgeous Moonie, especially The ISCKON Temple!
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#22 aloha_spirit

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 06:11 PM

I'm pretty sure Yosei will post about Utah, so I'll stick to Hawaii.

King Kamehameha III (son of Kamehameha the Great) moved the capital to Honolulu from Maui. His home is the only royal palace in the US. Iolani Palace had electric lights installed prior to the U.S. Capital building in Washington, DC. It also had running water back in the 1800s. Queen Liliuokalani (the last reigning monarch) was under house arrest in Iolani Palace when she wrote Aloha `oe.

La`ie is famous for the Polynesian Cultural Center, Brigham Young University - Hawaii, the LdS temple, and the shaka sign.

The Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC) is a world-reknown living museum. The land is divided into 7 main villages by a lagoon and rivers. Each village highlights the culture of a different island group. You should definitely check out the Tongan village which includes an authorized replication of the Queen's summer home. Every evening there is a Night Show which showcases all the cultures, and a luau. It normally takes 2 or 3 days to experience everything.

BYUH has students from over 60 nations. The flags of each of these countries is proudly displayed in the Little Circle in front of the McKay Foyer. The McKay Foyer has two gorgeous mosaics - one representing a flag raising ceremony, the other depicts Queen Liliuokalani spitting a sacred berry into the Hale Maumau Caldera - a defining moment of her reign.

The La`ie Temple is the first temple built by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints outside of North America. Ironicly it is constructed over 2 ancient heiau (temples) marking the boundaries of an ancient City of Refuge. This temple has a nice Visitors Center where the public may learn more about Mormonism and the village's history.

Many of you know the shaka sign as "hang loose." Back in the plantation days, a local farmer lost his three middle fingers off his right hand. Despite the mishap, he would still wave his remaining two fingers to people and say shaka (no worries). This symbol is now recognized across the globe.

I didn't lose my mind - I have it backed up on a disk ... somewhere


#23 MoonChild

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 06:08 PM

Some recent pictures in and around my home city, Kochi, India.

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#24 MoonChild

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 09:22 AM

Here are more from my Home Town - Kochi

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#25 spooksareus

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 03:00 PM

:clap: Ok Moonie, I've had with you :blush: I'm catching the next flight out and pitching a tent next door!

"It is perfectly monstrous the way people go about, nowadays, saying things against one behind one's back that are absolutely and entirely true." -Oscar Wilde “The Picture of Dorian Gray”


#26 Vampchick21

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 07:05 PM

The wife and daughter of one of the partners at work are in India right now as we speak, northern part of the country, near Delhi he said.

I'm frankly quite jealous. Especially after seeing Moonie's pics.

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#27 Ambra

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 11:05 PM

I've been fortunate to live in 2 areas of VA that have several interesting places around it. I grew up in the Tidewater area which is not only near the beach, but Jamestown, Colonial Williamsburg, Yorktown, historical Richmond, the Crater near Petersburg--if you've seen "Cold Mountain", there's a scene based on that battle, and many other historical places. There's also two amusement parks, Busch Gardens in Williamsburg and Kings Dominion just outside Richmond.

I now live in the Southwest area of the state which has Luray and Dixie Caverns, Natural Bridge, the National D-Day Memorial, Appomattox, and of course the Blue Ridge Parkway--

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Can you tell why they call it the "Blue Ridge"?

There's also Mabry Mills, the most photographed site in the state. You've probably seen it featured in postcards and calendars.

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I posted some other pics in the thread in this section called "Mabry Mills and the Blue Ridge Parkway" if you're interested in seeing more.

My mom has gotten me into touring wineries and there are several in the state and they make some real good wines! Here are the links to some near where I live.

http://www.thedogs.com
This is for Chateau Morrisette

http://www.villaappalaccia.com

http://westwindwine.com

Most of them have online ordering. If you want to try some I recommend the Angel Chardonay, the Sweet Mountain Laurel, and the Red Mountain Laurel from Chateau Morrisette, the Raspberry Beret and the Pinot Grigio from Villa Appalaccia, and the Chambourcin from West Wind. I'm no wine expert, but I know what I like! Also, despite the above list, I'm not a wino either, lol!

If anyone comes this way let me know--I'll try to give the tour of some of the places around here!
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#28 Ambra

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 11:21 PM

Oh, yeah, I forgot--I'm also near Franklin County, VA, the "Moonshine Capital of the World" and yes, I have tried authentic moonshine before!
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#29 ravenhecate

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 12:15 AM

Some little facts about Toledo, Ohio that might be of interest:

In 1850, Toledo became part of the underground railroad carrying slaves to Canada.

In 1900, the Ottawa Park Golf Course became the first public course west of New York City.

Singer Theresa Brewer is from the east side of Toledo (my very own part of town) and attended Waite High School. Ms. Brewer has recorded nearly 600 different song titles, released on over 150 vinyl singles and more than 80 albums.

Actor, Jamie Farr of M*A*S*H fame, hails from Toledo, having grown up not far from where Riverside Hospital stands

The R&B smash-hit artist, Anita Baker, was born in Toledo, OH

Two of Toledo’s early boom industries were the manufacturing of wagons and bicycles.

Toledo Inventor, Michael Owens developed the world's first automated bottle-blowing machine, revolutionizing the bottle industry.

On January 15, 1936, the first building to be completely covered in glass was constructed in Toledo. It was a building for the Owens-Illinois Glass Company and marked a milestone in architectural design that eventually led to the International style of architecture.

The Toledo Zoo, consistently rated as one of the nation's ten best, was the first zoo to feature a hippoquarium-style exhibit.

The Toledo Zoo was recently voted among the top 10 family-friendly zoos in the country by a recent survey conducted by Child Magazine.

The Mud Hens are one of minor league baseball's oldest teams in continuous operation, having first played in 1896.

The Libbey family's vision in creating the Toledo Museum of Art was to ensure the public would be able enjoy fine art from around the world without ever paying an admission. This still holds true today, thanks to the generous endowment left by the Libbeys

The Toledo Museum of Art is world-renowned and is often chosen as one of a few select museums in the world to receive major exhibits

Actress Katie Holmes, star of Dawson’s Creek and Batman Begins, hails from Toledo (and many people here are pretty embarrassed over her realtionship with Tom Cruise)

Toledo has long been rumored to have the “most restaurants per capita” in the country
A native of Toledo, activist Gloria Steinem co-founded Ms. Magazine and was one of the most visible leaders of the Feminist Movement.

Toledo’s Historic Old West End has the largest collection of Victorian homes east of the Mississippi.

The first permanent white settlers who entered into the Black Swamp came in 1832. It took these aggressive pioneers 10 full years to dig 100 miles of drainage ditches so that the land was able to be farmed

Toledo and Tony Packo’s Café (which originated in Toledo, and is honestly nothing to write home about IMO) were made famous by Jamie Farr, a.k.a. Corporal Klinger on the TV show M.A.S.H.

The origin of the exclamation, “Holy Toledo!” is unknown, but has been the focus of much speculation. Suggestions include: the heavy concentration of churches located on Collingwood Avenue; the mob completing a job in Detroit, Cleveland or elsewhere and then retreating to Toledo – the “Holy Land”; and the high proportion of bars to churches

Toledo was also the original place of manufacture for the JEEP vehicle.

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Baby Louie, the african elephant born at Toledo Zoo.

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Baby Juba, a gorilla born at Toledo Zoo.

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The cloisters located inside the world class Toledo Museum of Art. This room, which houses most of the Christian Art collection owned by the museum, is a replica of a monestary courtyard. It is frequently the site of much musical entertainment, including the Jubilatores, which a musical group that sepcializes in music from the middle ages.

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The Downtown Toledo Waterfront.

Thanks for this thread, Moonchild. I had to do some research for these facts. Didn't really know that much about the town I have lived in for the past 8 years.
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#30 erna_butter

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 03:23 AM

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Sorry its sooooo long, but I got alot of this off of the net...its been forever since I have been in school and found alot about my city that I hadn`t known before also




Quirky Facts




Montreal is the second largest French-speaking city on Earth (after Paris). People from Montreal are called "Montrealais".

Population of the City of Montreal - 1,876,900
Population of the Greater Montreal Area is 3,606,700

Montreal is 72 kilometres (45 miles) from the U.S. border.

The closest border crossings of the states of New York and Vermont are a one-hour drive from downtown Montreal.

The cities of Toronto, New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Washington are less than one hour and a half away by plane.

By car, Montreal is two hours from Ottawa, two hours and a half from Quebec City and five hours from Toronto.

Montreal has 19 bridges and tunnels.

Downtown Montreal measures a full 15 km in length and with almost 1,200 stores between Guy and Saint-Denis streets (including approximately 450 with storefront access on the street), Sainte-Catherine Street is home to the highest concentration of stores in Canada as well as the largest assortment of fashion boutiques and ready-to-wear shops in the country.

With more than 3,000 businesses, downtown Montreal is the largest commercial centre in Canada.

According to the 2001 census, the largest cultural communities are the following: Italian: 163,690 people;
Irish: 91,560 people;
English: 86,995 people;
Scottish: 59,470 people;
Haitian: 54,485 people;
Chinese: 44,735 people;
Greek: 35,385 people.

Every year, Montreal organizes the longest running Saint Patrick's Day Parade in North America. The very first parade was held in 1824. An estimated 300,000 Montrealers are of Irish descent.

Montreal is home to the largest Arab community in Canada. According to the 2001 census, 56,000 native Arabic speakers live in the Montreal area.

Montréal is the most bilingual metropolis on the North American continent.

In all, 80 languages are spoken in the Montréal region. The languages with the most speakers are French, English, Italian, Spanish, Arabic, Greek, Chinese, German and Portuguese. These are followed by Creole languages and Vietnamese

Montreal is famous for its bagels, poutine and smoked meat. Montreal bagels are different from New York and Toronto bagels in that they are made with eggs and are baked in wood ovens. In comparison, New York bagels are made with water and are spongy, while Toronto bagels are usually baked in gas ovens. The ruelle des Fortifications at the World Trade Centre is home to a piece of the Berlin Wall, which the German city gave to Montreal to mark the 350th anniversary of its founding.

Montreal is the only major Canadian city completely surrounded by water and, according to the experts, it is the shad fly capital of Canada

After Halifax, Montreal has the largest number of Titanic victims buried in its cemeteries-12 in all.

John Lennon and Yoko Ono held their legendary Bed-In from May 26 to June 2nd, 1969 in Suite 1742 at the Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth hotel in downtown Montreal. There, surrounded by celebrities such as Tommy Smothers, Timothy and Rosemary Leary and Petula Clark, they wrote the peace anthem, “Give Peace a Chance.”

The cross on Mount Royal was built in 1924 in remembrance of the events of December 25th, 1642, when a flood threatened to wash away the early French colony. On January 6, 1643, Paul de Chomedey, Sieur de Maisonneuve, carried a cross by himself to the top of the mountain to give thanks to God for sparing Ville- Marie from the floodwaters. Fibre-optic lighting, installed when Montréal celebrated its 350th anniversary, now illuminates the cross.

Measuring a full 50 kilometres in length, Gouin Boulevard is the longest street in Montréal.

The highest building in Montréal is the 1000 de la Gauchetiere. The skyscraper measures 205 metres, has 51 floors and was built in 1991.

The village that is now known under the name of Montreal was centuries ago named Hochelaga and it was an Iroquois establishment. Jacques Cartier has named the village in 1535 “The Royal Mountain” (“Mons realis” in French). In the 20th century the archaeologists have discovered some artefacts, which permitted them to evaluate the presence of human life in this place for 3,000 to 4,000 years BC. In the year 1615, Samuel de Champlain, who had already founded the city of Quebec in July 3rd 1608, thought it would be a wonderful idea to create another city on the Saint-Lawrence river. He thought that this way it would be much easier to promote the Catholicism among the natives from the New France. The French had not settled in Montreal till May 17th 1642 when a group of priests have founded the so-called Ville-Marie village. Among these colonisers we mention Jeanne Mance the men who founded the Dieu (God) hotel in Montreal, which was the first hospital in North America.

In August 1701, 1,300 American Indians, coming from the Northeast America, had met in Montreal (which had at that time approximately 1,200 citizens) to establish the peace between the many different tribes and the French. The Great Peace of Montreal, as this treaty was named, has put an end to the hostilities that handicapped the commerce of furs in the New France. Thus, the village has grown so much that it became one of the most important centres. This was the beginning of the French exploration of the inner continent. The city has been fortified in 1725 and has belonged to the French till 1760 when the Duke of Levis had surrendered to the British army lead by Lord Jeffrey Amherst. After the British conquest, Montreal had maintained its French features and that was possible because the majority of the population remained French. The only difference was that the rich were now the English, while the French belonged to the lower classes. Along the years there has developed a strong commercial bourgeoisie, which was mostly made of English people.

The development of banks and other financial institutions have given Montreal the possibility to become the number one financial centre in Canada till the first half of the 20th century. At the turn of the century, the great bourgeoisie of Montreal doesn't take into consideration the facts and refuse to invest in the Ontario's mine industry and Alberta's oil industry, which have been developing and which have made Toronto a very rich city. The graduate immigration of the population to the West has contributed to Montreal's decline during the next decades. The city's chance to become prosperous again remained to come up with an important industrial restructuring and with a development of the cultural industries. However, today, Montreal is the second largest city in Canada, being a major commercial, industrial, cultural and financial centre. The approximate population of Montreal is of 1,8 million people and 65% of the population is French.
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