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#31 MoonChild

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 03:54 AM

Wow intresting, Ambra those pictures rock! Erna and Raven, thanks for the posts.
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#32 erna_butter

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 04:06 AM

well you are welcome moonie, but I find Montreal is no where as interesting or pretty as where you are...I can honestly say that I am toatlly jealous now :Spaz:
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#33 Ambra

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 05:02 AM

well you are welcome moonie, but I find Montreal is no where as interesting or pretty as where you are...I can honestly say that I am toatlly jealous now :Spaz:


Ditto, Moonie! Those pictures of India are just beautiful! I'll definitely look into visiting there!
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#34 MoonChild

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Posted 15 October 2006 - 09:24 AM

A countryside near a small river! Outskirts of Cochin, my home town.
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#35 jenbrown

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Posted 15 October 2006 - 07:43 PM

This is so cool reading about where every one lives.

So here's my home:

I live in Santa Rosa, California. It's about 50 miles north of San Francisco. Santa Rosa is the hub of Sonoma County which is actually a very large part of California Wine Country. Next door to us is Napa which takes all the credit of wine country because frankly there's not much else. But next time you shop for a bottle of wine you will notice that many successful wineries in the US are in Sonoma County. I live about 5 minutes from them.

Santa Rosa has many famous people attached to it. Most popular was Peanuts creator and Minnesota transplant Charles Schulz. Despite being one of the most famous cartoon creators he was a very regular guy. He owned the local ice arena here and I would see him quite often hanging around the when I was young and used to go ice skating.

The novelist Jack London also lived and died in nearby Glen Ellen. His fantasy mansion, the "Wolf House" burned to the ground in a mysterious fire just before London's family was to move in. He committed suicide in his nearby cottage. Supposedly the Wolf house is haunted by London.

Robert Ripley, the Ripley's Believe it or Not creator also grew up here. He went to my high school and was editor of the school paper. The original Ripley's museum is located downtown in a church made from one solid redwood tree. Believe it or not. ;)

And speaking of my high school, the movie "Peggy Sue Got Married" was filmed there in my senior year of high school. It was a closed set so parts of our school were off limits during production. I never got to see any of the stars but I did see Francis Ford Coppola walking and talking with our principal and since I was a huge movie buff, he was as good as it gets. In 1997 the movie "Inventing the Abbotts" also filmed here. Also somewhat associated with my high school is the filming of "Scream". Wes Craven sought permission to film our school and our school board agreed....until they read the script. Then they said no way and ticked off Wes Craven so much that he added a "No thank you what so ever to Santa Rosa High..." in the ending credits to the movie.

Speaking of Scream...Yes, the movie was filmed here too. Mostly in Santa Rosa, and nearby Healdsburg, Tomales, and Sonoma. A friend of mine was an extra in the movie. I saw Neve Campbell and Rose McGowan film a scene downtown. Syndey's house is located on a private road about 5 minutes away from my home. I've been inside it before and it's not even as scary as the movie made it look.

Another movie claim to fame close by is the town of Bodega made famous in the Hitchcock movie "The Birds". It's about 30 minutes west of here. It's truly a cute, quaint blink-of-an-eye town with a definitely creepy vipe. In fact, the school house is just as famous for it's ghosts and it is for the movie. If you watch to movie, you will hear Santa Rosa mentioned several times during the movie. Hitchcock obviously like this area because before filming in Bodega, he filmed the original "Shadow of a Doubt" here downtown.

Here's one more important piece of Santa Rosa history. This always gets overshadowed, especially since it's the centennial anniversary of the great 1906 earthquake. Santa Rosa suffered the most damage and death per capita than San Francisco or any other town during the earthquake. Despite this area being associated with such a shaky history, I think it's the most beautiful area and I wouldn't want to live anywhere else. It's not as scary to live here as some people think.
"Serpents and spiders, tail of a rat. Call in the spirits, wherever they’re at!Rap on a table, it’s time to respond. Send us a message from somewhere beyond!Goblins and ghoulies from last Halloween, awaken the spirits with your tambourine! Creepies and crawlies... toads in a pond! Let there be music from regions beyond.Wizards and witches, wherever you dwell – give us a hint by ringing a bell!" Madame Leota

#36 jenbrown

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 01:36 PM

I'm bumping this one back up because I want to learn about everybody elses home!
"Serpents and spiders, tail of a rat. Call in the spirits, wherever they’re at!Rap on a table, it’s time to respond. Send us a message from somewhere beyond!Goblins and ghoulies from last Halloween, awaken the spirits with your tambourine! Creepies and crawlies... toads in a pond! Let there be music from regions beyond.Wizards and witches, wherever you dwell – give us a hint by ringing a bell!" Madame Leota

#37 rat girl

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 07:55 AM

hi everyone! im from Scotland, here's some information on my home land.

The people of Scotland are said to have a rock-solid identity and sense of self - they are proud of their heritage no matter where in the world they may have migrated. 5.2 million people inhabit Scotland and are mainly Caucasian, although many ethnicities can be found, particularly in the larger cities. Two-thirds of Scots belong to the Church of Scotland, although the more rigorous United Free Presbyterian Church is more popular in the Highlands and Islands.

Culturally speaking, Scotland can boast when it comes to folk art, literature and festivals. Encompassing all of these cultural facets is the annual Edinburgh International Festival - one the world's leading arts events. This is the largest festival in all of Britain and a must if you are interested in seeing fringe theatre, music and poetry being performed to audiences from all over the world. Throughout the year there are many other less famous, but equally enjoyable festivals presented within the country.


There are wide variations in climate over small distances in Scotland. Although the country lies just south of the Arctic Circle, the Gulf Stream winds keep the temperature relatively mild. The east coast tends to be cool and dry, with winter temperatures rarely dropping below freezing, while the west coast is milder and wetter, with average summer highs of 66 F. May and June are the driest months and July and August are the warmest.


of course we also have a lot of lochs, and the famous loch ness, i have never been to loch ness as its quite far from where i live, but i dont think a monster stays there!

we also have whisky, bagpipes, tartan and haggis.

and a soft drink called irn- bru [pronounced iron brew]
Scotland is one of the few places where Coca-Cola is not the number one soft drink. It's Irn Bru- an orangy-looking carbonated drink. And supposedly the best hangover cure around.

Edited by rat girl, 27 October 2006 - 07:55 AM.

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#38 Laurie Ann

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 08:17 AM

I absolutely love to hear and see about all the different places that my "family" is from! :hug:


I live in LaPorte, Indiana. The home of the infamouse Belle Gunness. If you look up Haunted Indiana, we have our fair share of haunted places...which makes life exciting here! I live a few blocks over from the "I" Street Clinic, which is built on top of an Indian Princess grave. Yep, the clinic is haunted and in the book. Oh, and we have corn here and where cow-tipping just isn't as fun as it sounds! :(
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#39 Roadkill

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 02:05 PM

Moonie, I too am jealous! You truly live in paradise man!

Okay now for me....
Lakewood, WA USA
Located 40 miles south of Seattle Washington, we are mainly a military town with 2 US Military bases nearby.
Lakewood, as I'm sure you are aware, is also home to the western state sanitarium. To me, that is probably the only substantial thing about Lakewood. I work in Tacoma, (10 miles north of lakewood), one of the largest natural Seaports in the Untied States. I work at one of the terminals in that seaport. Here are some pictures from our area:
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The Tacoma Dome (Largest Wooden Dome in the United States)
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Tacoma City Skyline
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The Port where I work at night
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Here's the terminal I work at

Nearby attractions:
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The Space Needle in Seattle
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Pike Place Market in Seattle (Said to be haunted)
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Who Doesn't know of this nearby landmark? Mt. St. Helens!
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Here's how St. Helens looks today

Edited by Roadkill, 27 October 2006 - 02:07 PM.

They're Here!

#40 jenbrown

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 11:05 PM

Those pics of Mt Saint Helens are incredible!
"Serpents and spiders, tail of a rat. Call in the spirits, wherever they’re at!Rap on a table, it’s time to respond. Send us a message from somewhere beyond!Goblins and ghoulies from last Halloween, awaken the spirits with your tambourine! Creepies and crawlies... toads in a pond! Let there be music from regions beyond.Wizards and witches, wherever you dwell – give us a hint by ringing a bell!" Madame Leota

#41 fallen wings133

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 08:54 AM

my home town is really nothing special. nobody knows where it is lmao. anyway its an alright place. its by the sea front and has a river running right though the town. we're sheltered from teh extremes of weather like snow or storms because of a cluster of hill called th esouth downs. there are quite a few old castles there aswel.
the people here could be friendlier but there are a lot of social issues here.

as some of you may be aware i travelle to ireland quite alot to a place called Ardee in county louth. its full of farmers and everybody seems to know everybody else. its a tight little community and the people who ive met there seem to be friendly. its similar to the outskirts of my town littlehampton as its full of fields.
well, im a slave and i am a master.this is the beginning then. the beggining of the end

#42 WalksWithDeath

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 10:45 AM

hi i come for tallaght which is about 13miles for dublin city center


History of Tallaght

The documented history of Tallaght dates back to early Christian Ireland but the many archaeological sites in the area suggest the presence of Bronze Age and perhaps even earlier settlers in the area.

The place name Tallaght is derived from the words támh leacht, meaning a plague burial place. The earliest mention of Tallaght in recorded history is the account of Parthalon in the Annals of the Four Masters. Parthalon the Greek was one of the early invaders of Ireland. A plague killed 9,000 of his followers in one week and they were buried in Tallaght and its environs and so the place came to be named Taimleach Muintire Parthalon. However, the burials which have been found in the Tallaght area are all normal pre-historic interments, mainly of the Bronze Age, and nothing suggesting a mass grave has so far been recorded here.

With the foundation of the monastery of Tallaght by St. Maelruain in 769 A.D. we have a more reliable record of Tallaght’s early history. The monastery was a centre of learning and piety and was particularly associated with the Céli Dé spiritual reform movement. It was such an important institution that it and the monastery at Finglas were known as the “two eyes of Ireland”. St. Aengus, an Ulsterman, was one of the most illustrious of the Céli Dé and devoted himself to the religious life. Wherever he went he was accompanied by a band of followers who distracted him from his devotions. He secretly travelled to the monastery at Tallaght where he was not known and enrolled as a lay brother. He remained unknown for many years until his identity was discovered by Maeilruain. They later wrote the Martyrology of Tallaght together and St. Aengus also wrote a calendar of saints known as the Féilire of Aengus.

St. Maelruain’s Church of Ireland now occupies the site of the original monastery. The present day church was built in 1829 and replaced an earlier one to which the still existing tower belonged. The tower is four stories high and has a spiral staircase. An external stairs gives access to the first floor and the spiral stairway to the floors above. The third floor has a vaulted stone ceiling above which is the flat roof and a small turret. In 1662 the churchwardens were granted a sum of £100 in compensation for damage done by Captain Alland who had been stationed there with his troops in 1651. He stripped off the roof of the church and used the timber slates and pews for his own house. He also used the paving stones to pave the entrance to his kitchen and fed his horses from the font.

There are a number of interesting historic features in the grounds of the church. On left inside the churchyard gate is a font called St. Maelruain’s Losset. This is a wide and shallow granite stone trough or font. ‘Losat’ is an Old Irish word denoting a wooden trough used in former times for kneading bread. It is likely that the country people named it from its similarity in shape to the lossets which they used in their homes. St. Maelruain’s Cross lies south of the font. It is a small ancient cross set in a pedestal which is fixed in a circular granite base resembling a mill stone. The pedestal and base were formerly known as Moll Rooney’s loaf and griddle and the font was called Moll Rooney’s Losset. There are a great many tombstones in the graveyard dating mainly from the 18th and 19th centuries, and some even from the 17th century. One of these commemorates Colonel John Talbot of Belgard who sat in the Parliament of James II and took part in many important military engagements. The graves of the artists Oisin Kelly, Evie Hone and Elizabeth Rivers are in the new graveyard at St. Maelruain’s. Also to be seen in the grounds of the church is the remains of the fosse, the ancient curved bank which enclosed Maelruain’s monastery. The best view is from the carpark at the rear of Smith’s Toystore.

St. Maelruain died in 792 and was buried in Tallaght. The influence of the monastery continued after his death, as can be judged by the fact that, in 806, the monks of Tallaght were able to prevent the holding of the Tailtin Games, because of some infringement of their rights. In 811 the monastery was devastated by the Vikings but the destruction was not permanent and the annals of the monastery continued to be recorded throughout the following centuries. After the Anglo-Norman invasion in 1179 Tallaght and its appurtenances were confirmed to the See of Dublin and became the property of the Archbishop. The complete disappearance of every trace of what must have been an extensive and well organised monastic settlement can only be accounted for by the subsequent history of the place, the erection and demolition of defensive walls and castles, and the incessant warfare and destruction that lasted for hundreds of years.

Throughout the greater part of the 13th century a state of comparative peace existed at Tallaght, but subsequently the O’Byrnes and O’Tooles took offensive action and were joined by many of the Archbishop’s tenants. As a result of this the land was not tilled, the pastures were not stocked and the holdings were deserted. In 1310 the bailiffs of Tallaght got a royal grant to enclose the town. No trace of these defensive walls survive and we don’t have any evidence of their exact location, except for the name of the Watergate Bridge which spans the stream on the Oldbawn Road.

In 1324 building commenced on Tallaght castle and it was finished some time before 1349. A century later it was reported to be in need of repair. When Archbishop Hoadley replaced Archbishop King in 1729 he found it in ruins, which he demolished and built himself a palace at a cost of £2,500. By 1821 the palace too had fallen into ruin and an Act of Parliament was passed which stated that it was unfit for habitation. The following year it was sold to Major Palmer, Inspector General of Prisons who pulled the palace down and used the materials to build his mansion, Tallaght House, as well as a schoolhouse and several cottages. Tallaght House is now incorporated in the buildings at St. Mary’s Priory.

An ancient tower was spared in the demolition of the palace and was later incorporated into the buildings of St. Mary’s Priory where it still stands today. It contains a spiral staircase and was originally four stories high but is now reduced internally to two. Attached to the castle was a long building which was used in the archbishop’s time as a brewery and later on as a granary and stables. Under the Dominicans it was converted into a chapel and was used as such until 1883 when the new church was built. The grounds of the Priory, the old palace gardens, still retain many features from the historic past such as the Archbishop’s bathhouse, the Friar’s Walk and St. Maelruain’s Tree.

The old constabulary barracks on the main street was the scene of the engagement known as the Battle of Tallaght which occurred during the Fenian rising on 5th March 1867. On that night the Fenians moved out to assemble at the appointed place on Tallaght Hill. The large number of armed men alarmed the police in Tallaght who sent warning to the nearest barracks. There were fourteen constables and a head constable under Sub-inspector Burke at Tallaght, and they took up a position outside the barracks where they commanded the roads from both Greenhills and Templeogue. The first body of armed men came from Greenhills and, when they came under police fire, retreated. Next a party came from Templeogue, and were also dispersed. In 1936 a skeleton, sword-bayonet and water bottle were found in a hollow tree stump near Terenure. It is thought that these were the remains of one of the Fenians who had taken refuge there after the Battle of Tallaght and either died of his wounds or was frozen to death.

The 17th and 18th centuries brought many changes to Tallaght. Many mills were built along the Dodder and this brought new prosperity which saw the building of many houses in the area. In 1888 the Dublin to Blessington Steam Tramway opened and it passed through Tallaght Village. This provided a new means of transporting goods and also brought day-trippers from the city.

The 20th century saw the biggest changes taking place in Tallaght, however, when it was decided in the 1960s by Dublin County Council planners that a new town would be built around Tallaght village. This decision started the process that turned Tallaght from a small country village into the place we know today. Further significant changes took place in the 1990s with the construction of major buildings such as the Square Shopping Centre, the hospital and IT Tallaght. With the reorganisation of local government in the Dublin region, South Dublin County Council came into existence and set up its headquarters at Tallaght in 1994. Since the early 1970s, Tallaght has developed from a small village into a huge suburban area, with a population of over 100,000. It is still a rapidly changing area. The designation of tax incentive sites and the arrival of the LUAS have encouraged a development boom.

this is just a little info on were i live

#43 Ambra

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 02:39 PM

hi everyone! im from Scotland, here's some information on my home land.

The people of Scotland are said to have a rock-solid identity and sense of self - they are proud of their heritage no matter where in the world they may have migrated. 5.2 million people inhabit Scotland and are mainly Caucasian, although many ethnicities can be found, particularly in the larger cities. Two-thirds of Scots belong to the Church of Scotland, although the more rigorous United Free Presbyterian Church is more popular in the Highlands and Islands.

Culturally speaking, Scotland can boast when it comes to folk art, literature and festivals. Encompassing all of these cultural facets is the annual Edinburgh International Festival - one the world's leading arts events. This is the largest festival in all of Britain and a must if you are interested in seeing fringe theatre, music and poetry being performed to audiences from all over the world. Throughout the year there are many other less famous, but equally enjoyable festivals presented within the country.


There are wide variations in climate over small distances in Scotland. Although the country lies just south of the Arctic Circle, the Gulf Stream winds keep the temperature relatively mild. The east coast tends to be cool and dry, with winter temperatures rarely dropping below freezing, while the west coast is milder and wetter, with average summer highs of 66 F. May and June are the driest months and July and August are the warmest.


of course we also have a lot of lochs, and the famous loch ness, i have never been to loch ness as its quite far from where i live, but i dont think a monster stays there!

we also have whisky, bagpipes, tartan and haggis.

and a soft drink called irn- bru [pronounced iron brew]
Scotland is one of the few places where Coca-Cola is not the number one soft drink. It's Irn Bru- an orangy-looking carbonated drink. And supposedly the best hangover cure around.



OMG, ratgirl, It's so funny you mentioned irn bru! I have an online friend who lives in Glasgow and we had a whole MSN messenger discussion once where she was trying to explain to me what it was and what it tastes like! I've had to add it to my list of things to try when I get the chance to go over there!
I got smacked by aloha spirit!Posted Image

#44 Crone

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 10:48 PM

I haven't strayed very far from my home town. I can drive there in about 15 minutes. Although I haven't lived there for about 20 years, Benton Harbor, Michigan is still home. It's in the southwest corner of Michigan's lower peninsula, along Lake Michigan's east coast.

What was once mainly swampland was bordered by the St. Joseph river, through which a canal was built, forming the harbor from which it received its name. It's founders were Henry Morton, Sterne Brunson, and Charles Hull. The settlement was first know back in 1863 as Brunson Harbor, and later changed to Benton Harbor, after Senator Hart Benton.

In its prime, Benton Harbor saw a lot of trading with Chicago, which was only 100 miles by land, and less than 70 miles by water. The early 1900's brought Brother Benjamin and his wife Mary to form the House of David, a communal religious group. Many of the old houses within the commune, such as the Shiloh House are still standing. There are only a handful of members alive today, and they strive to keep the memory of life as they knew it alive.

We once boasted the largest open-air non-citrus fruit market in the world. We are home to the World Headquarters for the Whirlpool corporation. Some of Benton Harbor's famous sons include actor Ernie Hudson, comedian Arte Johnson (for those of you who are old enough to remember Laugh-In), and actor/comedian Sinbad (real name David Atkins).

Sadly, Benton Harbor has seen a great decline over the last 40 years. As in many cities across the country, there was great racial unrest in the mid 60's, that scarred this once beautiful city. It has never really recovered. There is poverty and illiteracy among its 11,000+ population today. The racial tension is still very real. Jobs within the city are scarce. Drug use and crime is high. The crime is what prompted me to leave my home, and seek a safer place to live where I didn't have to worry about whether my home was being broken into, or if stray bullets would hit me or someone I loved.

This hasn't kept me away, though. Some people have called me foolish, but I still enjoy driving through my old neighborhood and stopping to see old neighbors. When my old grade school shut its doors last year, I couldn't help but go back and take one last walk through its halls.

I prefer to remember my home town as it once was.
Still crazy after all these years. ....Paul Simon.... “What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others.” ....Pericles......

#45 Mrs. Bryan

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 12:08 AM

Even though I live in the Metropolis City of Tucson, AZ. (Ack, Hack, Gag!), my REAL Love is Taos, NM which will be my Home as of February of Next Year.
These Links will give you Photos and other Information about Taos, NM. that I Really Cannot put it into words because it is SOOO Highly Spiritual, that if you Experience something, it is Sacred to the Individual, and Cannot be put into words by the Experiencer.
Taos has to be "Experienced" for oneself.
Taos is alos HAUNTED!
Not only is it HAUNTED, but the Ghosts are also SO Friendly, that they Welcome you in as Family, as much as what the Living in that Area do.
Taos,NM is known as the City of Museums, as it has a Large Number of Museums and Artist Colony Shops.

http://www.taospueblo.com
http://www.taoschamber.com
http://www.taosmuseums.org
http://www.taosgov.com
http://www.taoswebb.com
http://www.theshadow...s/newmexico.htm




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