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Scholomance


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#1 Seņor Hugo

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 10:34 PM

Scholomance, which most likely translates out of School of Magic has been used in many works of fiction.

Bram Stoker used this mythic school in his book, Dracula.

Scholomance also makes an appearance in the game World of Warcraft(which was the first place I heard it was based on an actual legend.

So what is Scholomance?

Like I said above, it was a school of magic hidden somewhere in the mountains of Romania. Emily Gerard first wrote about the school in her book collecting Romanian/Transylvanian folklore called "Transylvanian Superstitions."

As I am on the subject of thunderstorms, I may as well here mention the Scholomance, or school supposed to exist somewhere in the heart of the mountains, and where all the secrets of nature, the language of animals, and all imaginable magic spells and charms are taught by the devil in person. Only ten scholars are admitted at a time, and when the course of learning has expired and nine of them are released to return to their homes, the tenth scholar is detained by the devil as payment, and mounted upon an Ismeju (dragon) he becomes henceforward the devil's aide-de-camp, and assists him in 'making the weather,' that is, in preparing thunderbolts. A small lake, immeasurably deep, lying high up among the mountains south of Hermanstadt, is supposed to be the cauldron where is brewed the thunder, and in fair weather the dragon sleeps beneath the waters.


The school being based in the mountains south of Hermanstadt. For those who venture to google maps upon reading this, like I did upon first reading the article. You'll be looking for the town of Sibiu.

The people who attended the school were described as "tall-redhaired men clad in wool" by Katherine Ramsland, who went on to say "they possessed several magical tools and a book of instruction" several instruments of magic and a book of instruction." She also goes on to explain that they are "trained for nine years...overcoming obstacles and surviving ordeals. Their final examination involved copying all that they knew about humanity into the Solomonar's book.

Now, for those who know a thing or two about religions back then. The people that are described sound uncannily like druids, well at least from what we can piece together about them.

For those that don't know. Druids were believed to be keepers of knowledge, I can't remember if they just horded the knowledge or gave it to those willing to learn it.

But, they do sound like druids.

Which is very interesting. There is very little on the subject of Scholomance, everything I got was from Wikipedia, save for what I said about the druids, which I gathered from speaking to friends who practice druidism.

I figure the school would be called a school of black magic, because of the Christian movement through Europe. Witch hunting, the whole bit.

So if the school did exist. There is a possibility that the school was destroyed by angry mobs or something.

http://en.wikipedia....iki/Scholomance

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Emily_Gerard

Edited by Seņor Hugo, 16 September 2008 - 10:35 PM.

"I am the bridge between worlds. I have experienced life, I have experienced death, others and my own. I am a shaman."

#2 eatnama

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 05:36 AM

I came across scholomance in Dracula and found it very interesting. I've always thought druids were more "nature oriented", so keeping one scholar as a payment doesn't really fit in. I'd be more inclined to believe it really was a school of black magick, something do with worshipping gods that were considered dark even at that time. Otherwise, we would have more evidence of the scholomance.

#3 Seņor Hugo

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 09:11 PM

I came across scholomance in Dracula and found it very interesting. I've always thought druids were more "nature oriented", so keeping one scholar as a payment doesn't really fit in. I'd be more inclined to believe it really was a school of black magick, something do with worshipping gods that were considered dark even at that time. Otherwise, we would have more evidence of the scholomance.


However you have to remember that the myths were probably twisted to suit the times, as Christianity was sweeping across Europe, anything seen as "ungodly" was instantly labeled as evil.

Druids are nature oriented, and like I suggested, keeping one scholar as "payment" probably meant he was one of the gifted students and was given a job teaching, or was not ready to graduate so he was held on.

Since most Druid knowledge and practices were all but completely lost back then, this could account for the reason we don't know more about Scholomance.
"I am the bridge between worlds. I have experienced life, I have experienced death, others and my own. I am a shaman."

#4 aya&aki

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 08:09 AM

interesting. very interesting.

first off, i maybe a person of contradictions so please bear with my ideas. i am willing to expound if there are unclear points.

i am a christian..Roman Catholic at that..but i believe in this school...more importantly, i have attended it.

i have but one comment that will hopefully explain it all.
"SYMBOLISMS are almost always used."(disregard the almost)

another would be "read between the lines" and etc.. you know where im going to..

...good luck!
"The Open-mindness of a person can be measured by his/her ability to accept that everything is right and everything is wrong. There are no such things as contradictions, just two sides of the same coin." -Samantha Williams

#5 devo01

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 12:31 AM

I sure would like aya&aki to expound on his experience on the school.






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