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Bug Detection


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#1 regjr

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 10:48 PM

I was reviewing a thermal video I took this past weekend at a local cemetery (around 12:30 am). I had a KII, Trifield and an Extech EMF meter in use while doing an EVP session. All three were registering fluctuations in the readings during the EVP session and about the same time, in the thermal video, a bright round object appears to come from behind the Trifield and then circle around the grave and then zoom away. I checked and found that some insects (like moths or bees) can generate enough heat during flight and could possibly be seen on thermal. I, along with the other two people there, were at least five feet away and we don't recall any flying insects. I've been using this thermal camera in different investigations, both indoors and outdoors and in caves for almost a year and I've never seen this before in all the footage. Does anyone here who has used a thermal camera ever picked up the heat from a flying insect?

#2 CaveRat2

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 08:20 AM

Absolutely. Most thermal imaging systems will detect insects. Even though cold blooded, insects in flight will create a certain amount of heat simply by muscular action. It's the same principle as when we excercise and get warm doing so. Energy is expended by the insect in flight, that energy can be detected as heat. Of course some insects will generate more than others, a lot has to do the amount of energy expended. Larger insects likely will show brighter, although with greater mass these may not react as quickly unless they have been in flight for a period of time.

I also should emphasize my response assumes by thermal video you mean a true passive system, not simply an IR source camera. I use a FLIR system (passive) and have gotten the responses I noted. If you are just using an IR system, then consider some insects reflect back IR with a shift in color rendering them visible to the camera. These are not true thermal cameras.

#3 CaveRat2

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 08:21 AM

Absolutely. Most thermal imaging systems will detect insects. Even though cold blooded, insects in flight will create a certain amount of heat simply by muscular action. It's the same principle as when we excercise and get warm doing so. Energy is expended by the insect in flight, that energy can be detected as heat. Of course some insects will generate more than others, a lot has to do the amount of energy expended. Larger insects likely will show brighter, although with greater mass these may not react as quickly unless they have been in flight for a period of time.

I also should emphasize my response assumes by thermal video you mean a true passive system, not simply an IR source camera. I use a FLIR system (passive) and have gotten the responses I noted. If you are just using an IR system, then consider some insects reflect back IR with a shift in color rendering them visible to the camera. These are not true thermal cameras.

#4 regjr

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 10:09 AM

The camera I have is a Raytheon Palm 225. I must say that it has come in handy in pinpointing normal occurrences that, prior to usage, had been identified as "paranormal". Thx




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