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investigating/EVP work in a car?


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#1 aprilmoonflower

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 07:02 AM

Has anyone done EVP work in a car?

My husband was in car accident and died. In our car. It was fixed and returned to me. I would love to try to make contact.

Actually at one point my mom and I went to get flowers to put where he died and the car got so cold we had to turn the heat on. In Arizona, in AUGUST. I never thought anything of it until recently when I have been studying more about paranormal phenomena. (mind you the cold thing happened on the eve of his death a year after it happened) I have had other experiences too concerning him.

It's been 4 years since his death and I have definitely moved on in life (and away from where we lived) but always wonder about these experiences. Anyway I still have the car..I thought investigating it would be cool. I am up for it. Not scared. I'd love to be able to tell him a thing or two..(our relationship did not end on good terms, or rather it seemd to but come to find out he had a whole secret lif going on..long story) I feel strongly he will come through.

What would the best recorder be for this type of investigation?

#2 CaveRat2

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 07:43 AM

Best recorder is the same as any EVP work. A good quality analog stereo recorder, no digital unless you are willing to spend a few hundered dollars to get something in stereo, with a sample rate of over 96 KBPS and 24 bit A to D conversion. That rules OUT any of the digital voice recorders, they lack sufficient quality. (The H2 at just under $200 is the cheapest digital I have found taht meets specs, but only in its highest quality setting)

Otherwise I see no difference in doing EVP in a car than any other location. Assuming of course the car is not running at the time! Also be aware that the suspension and other mechanical aspects of the car are subject to cause noise if anyone moves around so you'll have to be very still to prevent noises which might be mistaken for EVPs.

Good luck!

#3 aprilmoonflower

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 05:43 PM

Can you reccomend a recorder for a newbie? what brand?

#4 CaveRat2

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 08:06 AM

Can you reccomend a recorder for a newbie? what brand?


If price is your primary concern, I would recommend an analog stereo casette recorder. Personally I use a home type deck. While not protable, I have found EVP is best done by placing the recorder in one location and using an external mic. Recorders should NEVER be caried around while recording anyway since movement causes many false positives. (clothing brushing, your own footsteps, air movement, etc.) I recommend any of the old style units, back when they put them in steel boxes instead of plastic. That steel case provides a level of immunity to RF interference.

To get one of these, I recommend eBay. There are often units of this type for sale relatively inexpensive. I have seen them for under $50, however you should be careful to insure what you buy does actually work. (A problem with buying anything electronic second hand.) To get one of these you will need to find something made back in the late 1980s or early 90s. But if you're fortunate you can get a cassette deck the may have originally cost several hundred dollars for under $50. (I've done this myself a few times) Brand names are not important as long as you stay away from the unknowns. JVC, Sony, Panasonic, Marantz, Harmon-Kardon, Akia, Sharp, are all satisfactory.

Now if you are going digital, Digital is newer and the deals aren't as good second hand so I would recommend buying new if you choose digital. The cheapest digital that conditionally meets specs is the H2 series. ( Samson and others market this.) The conditions being that (1) You always use it in its high quality setting. The lower quality settings do not meet specs. (2) you buy external microphones for it. the internal ones, while good, are too close together to allow for spatial analysis of your recording. Mics should be 30 inches apart for proper stereo recording when doing EVPs. The H2 sells for $200 retail; you can find it discounted to around $170 online if you shop around.

If money is no object and you want to go first class digital, I recommend the Fostex FR2. Price tag on that one is $1199 though. But it is a good one!!! (should be at that price!)

#5 aprilmoonflower

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 05:30 PM

thanks for the info. I am going to check these out!

Can you reccomend a recorder for a newbie? what brand?


If price is your primary concern, I would recommend an analog stereo casette recorder. Personally I use a home type deck. While not protable, I have found EVP is best done by placing the recorder in one location and using an external mic. Recorders should NEVER be caried around while recording anyway since movement causes many false positives. (clothing brushing, your own footsteps, air movement, etc.) I recommend any of the old style units, back when they put them in steel boxes instead of plastic. That steel case provides a level of immunity to RF interference.

To get one of these, I recommend eBay. There are often units of this type for sale relatively inexpensive. I have seen them for under $50, however you should be careful to insure what you buy does actually work. (A problem with buying anything electronic second hand.) To get one of these you will need to find something made back in the late 1980s or early 90s. But if you're fortunate you can get a cassette deck the may have originally cost several hundred dollars for under $50. (I've done this myself a few times) Brand names are not important as long as you stay away from the unknowns. JVC, Sony, Panasonic, Marantz, Harmon-Kardon, Akia, Sharp, are all satisfactory.

Now if you are going digital, Digital is newer and the deals aren't as good second hand so I would recommend buying new if you choose digital. The cheapest digital that conditionally meets specs is the H2 series. ( Samson and others market this.) The conditions being that (1) You always use it in its high quality setting. The lower quality settings do not meet specs. (2) you buy external microphones for it. the internal ones, while good, are too close together to allow for spatial analysis of your recording. Mics should be 30 inches apart for proper stereo recording when doing EVPs. The H2 sells for $200 retail; you can find it discounted to around $170 online if you shop around.

If money is no object and you want to go first class digital, I recommend the Fostex FR2. Price tag on that one is $1199 though. But it is a good one!!! (should be at that price!)



#6 OMPRDave

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 05:18 PM

I grabbed a Sharp professional quality recorder from a University clearance on eBay for $10...it even hs a built in amplifier and PA for playing directly through the unit. Amazing the deals you can get there is you look around.

Edited by OMPRDave, 26 September 2009 - 05:18 PM.

"There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance - that principle is contempt prior to investigation." Herbert Spencer




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