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Native American Burial Grounds


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#46 UnkleBunny

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 12:29 AM

unfortunatly, the shosone, are a bit out of my leauge.. I'm more familiar, with Lakota, and Cherokee traditions. but i am a bit over cautious, when it comes to the SPirits of the Locals, (as I jokingly call us Injuns), as I've encountered Skinwalkers, out in the badlands, and I'm still wondering sometimes, how I got out of there.... very bad things, and California's a prime area.

#47 whispers_of_fire

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 01:04 PM

Thanks, Unkle Bunny, I agree, you'd figure that Cal would be thick...especially Southern Cal, if I'm on the same page as far as skinwalkers go
Remember...vote for New Orleans for our '05 Reunion...this is not a subliminal message...New Orleans! Obey Whispers of Fire! New Orleans

#48 UnkleBunny

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 02:41 PM

yep.... definatly.. especially out in the desert.... the one thing going, skinwalkes, don't like areas, that are too inhabited....they tend to stay out, where they can keep the element of surprise... (general announcement: if I sound a bit loopier, than usual, I am on some booty-whomping cold pills)

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 06:17 PM

Indian Mounds are not meerly for the evil. I am Anishnabe Qua from the Thornapple River Band of Odawa Indians.  Our mounds were for family burial.  Members of one family were buried together-many generations.  As a young girl I was part of a Indian youth group and we cleaned the mounds every spring.  There is a park a couple hundred yards from the mounds, make out place I guess.  Needless to say the trash gets pretty bad out there.  I have never felt any fear when we are at the mounds and often it was a very claming place-once it was cleaned up.  Traditional speaking if you feel that you need to explore these mounds go in a good way.  Do not go with ill thoughts or bad feelings because that sets the tone-everything in life should be done in a good way.  Bring your samon (tobaco), buffalo sage or sweet grass.  Smudgeing yourself prior to going is a good idea- this would be burning the sage or sweet grass and allowing the smoke to cover your body-really cover your hair and head.  The only time that I have been taught to leave an offering is when I was taking someting with me or I was praying.  I suggest that you not take anything from the area, if there is something there that is dark it may follow you home (Bearwalk).  We bring food to those sprits only when it is in a ceremonial offering.  This food would be something that you have eaten yourself- small portions of a meal you had earlier in the day.  I by no means feel that I am an expert on Native American tradition, but I was brought up traditonaly (as much as you can be in todays world). Safe journey friend.  

#50 whispers_of_fire

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 09:22 AM

Hi, Bigtruck,
I'd like to extend an invitation to join GV as a full member, but in the meantime, feel free to pull up a thread and share your experiences.

I like the smudging idea before going in a lot, thanks. I'm
inclined to go with a food offering<corn meal or jerky>and tobacco since I'm not only a non-Native American, but I'm a stranger to the area as well, so it only seems respectful to
bring a gift, thank you for your insights and I hope you'll consider joining.

Light's Blessings,
Whispers of fire

Hey, Unkle Bunny,
I hope its nothing serious, man, but it sounds like an antibiotic you're on.

I'm afraid my knowledge of skinwalkers is limited, I know there are a few kinds, those who practice black magick, the taboo breakers and I think its possible to be born one as well, but that may be my mis-remembering. I know that even going into an area they inhabit is call for major purification rituals to cleanse the taint
Remember...vote for New Orleans for our '05 Reunion...this is not a subliminal message...New Orleans! Obey Whispers of Fire! New Orleans

#51 hawkerdriver

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 10:32 AM

I am VERY interested to learn of everything you know bigtruck!  Growning up in Northern New Mexico with the Pueble indians I have great respect for the American Indian.  I went to University with some Navajos and am so intrigued with the Native American religion.  So very profound!  I lived in Los Alamos which is right next to Bandelier and of course the area was once inhabited by the anasazi (ancient ones).  Chaco canyon is the main hub where the anasazi were at.  Do pick out a spot and stay awhile.  Welcome!
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#52 Tuscarora

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Posted 05 January 2004 - 01:39 AM

  You have as much to fear from evil spirits in a native burial ground, as you would in any other cemetery.  Native Americans are a spiritual people, but then so are Catholics, Lutherans, and Baptists.  It is always respectful to observe the beliefs of a people buried in their religion's sacred ground, but you don't have to worry about evil spirits, if you don't.  Would you feel endangered, if you didn't cross yourself before entering a Catholic cemetary?  The most important thing to remember when entering ANY burial ground is to treat it with respect.  We should NEVER participate, or condone archaeological digs, of any kind, on this sacred ground.  Such digs are an obscenity.  Visiting a native burial ground or any other burial ground requires that you follow only two simple rules...take only memories...and leave only footprints.

#53 MoonChild

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Posted 05 January 2004 - 02:12 AM

 The most important thing to remember when entering ANY burial ground is to treat it with respect.


Visiting a native burial ground or any other burial ground requires that you follow only two simple rules...take only memories...and leave only footprints.


very true.

in our belief system, once the rituals of cremation are done right, then the spirit who leaves the body does not have any "material" attachments with that body. But, as you have pointed out, any "mis-respect" can be harmful for the living. also the occultic powers who rules the underworld, and places like burial grounds and cemetries can be very harmful for those who violate.


by the way, WELCOMT TO GV TUSCARORA
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#54 whispers_of_fire

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Posted 05 January 2004 - 09:17 AM

[move][glow=blue,2,300]Welcome to GV, Tuscarora ;D[/glow][/move]

I agree there seems to be some sort of attachment to the physical remains/burial site, though I think that may depend on cultural beliefs.

Respect's true no matter what the culture, I agree, whether or not you're born to that culture or not, I mean most people wouldn't barge into someone's home, start snapping pictures, turn on the tv, snag any intriguing bit of trinket and ask for something to eat, never mind...my brother does that on a regular basis*snickers*
Remember...vote for New Orleans for our '05 Reunion...this is not a subliminal message...New Orleans! Obey Whispers of Fire! New Orleans

#55 UnkleBunny

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Posted 06 January 2004 - 12:10 AM

Whisper; nah, it was jsut some really high powered docter given cold pills, to knock out the bug going around.....now as far as skinwalkers are concerned... yes... there are the "evil wizard" types: black magicians who turn into animals, and walk the world, in search of power... there's the evil spirt ones,, that were said once to be those who ate raw meat, or some tribes beleived human meat....but some kind of forbidden meat would do it.... definatly, if you ate the meat of your totem, would turn you into a skinwalker. also, I'm not sure, about the being born as one... if BigTruck hangs around, they might be able to help me there!!! *it's nice to not be the only Traditional around...hehe)

#56 Tuscarora

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Posted 06 January 2004 - 07:55 AM

 Some tribes, such as the Seneca, Cayuga, and others, upon killing a buffalo, would immediately cut open it's belly and eat the animal's raw liver.  They believed that by doing this, the spitit and strength of the buffalo would be passed on to them.  
  My Grandmother used to tell me stories of skinwalkers, or shapeshifters.  According to her, they were the spirits of those who were so weighed down by the evil that they had done in life, that upon death, their spirits were not allowed to fly to the west.  Their spirits would forever be bound to the physical world, where they would exist for eternity, unloved and shunned by both the physical, and spiritual worlds.  They would have to assume different identities in an attempt to hide what they really were.  Apparently, they could present themselves as human or animal, and it was very dangerous to come into contact with one.
  Grandma actually claimed to have seen skinwalkers...swore she had a horse that was one.  When I asked her how I'd know if someone was a shapeshifter, her reply was, "don't worry, you'll know."  

#57 UnkleBunny

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Posted 06 January 2004 - 08:20 AM

yeah, "don't worry, you'll know", or "don't worry you will" is a common Native phrase of learning... it's actually very true, however...

#58 whispers_of_fire

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Posted 06 January 2004 - 03:32 PM

Hi, Tuscarora,
Hmmm...many of the tribes of the SW won't even shake hands for fear of skinwalkers, likewise is touching the dead a taboo, its curious, though the touching the dead I understand as any spirit can be hovering in the area and a touch may constitute an invitation to move in.

The eating an organ or drinking blood I have heard of to absorb a trait or the kill's couage/cunning, even the inherent magic. In fact I think the European classic age and medieval custom of claiming an enemies weapons was an attempt to do the same*and not be branded a ghoul by the more church influenced society :-/

Tusc,if I can ask, are you from around Toronto? The reason I'm asking is I grew up in Upstate NY and those were the native tribes, the Seneca nation/confederacy.

Hey, Unkle Bunny, DUDE...lots of nasty stuff going around, there's actually a flu-related death toll in Cal/Col so booty-whomping meds or not, its HECKA better than the alternative, my friend.

Not trying to sound disrespectful, but hopefully you know the presence of a skinwalker before you're actually tainted.
Speaking of that, is it touch/proximity?
Remember...vote for New Orleans for our '05 Reunion...this is not a subliminal message...New Orleans! Obey Whispers of Fire! New Orleans

#59 Tuscarora

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Posted 08 January 2004 - 07:17 PM

     Hi Whispers,
  Yeah, I am from Hamilton.  Its about 45 miles from Toronto.  My people come from the Six Nations reservation, in Oshweken.  I live about 25 miles from the rez.  The Six Nations consists of: Seneca, Cayuga, Onandaga, Mohawk, Oneida and Tuscarora.  The Seneca at Six Nations are part of what used to be known as The Six Nations Of The Iroquois Confederacy...now, simply known as the Haudenosaunee (People of the Long House).  As I understand it, the evil of a skinwalker, can be transmitted through touch, or acceptance, i.e. as a friend.

#60 UnkleBunny

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Posted 10 January 2004 - 12:24 PM

I've always been taught, that it's through prolonged contact, or by the Skinwalker touching your soul.. but that again, can be minor tribal variations... (then again i wasn't raised tribal, so it could also be family variations...hehe)




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